Tor Project Pilots Exit Nodes In Libraries

An anonymous reader writes: The Tor Project has announced a new initiative to open exit relays in public libraries. “This is an idea whose time has come; libraries are our most democratic public spaces, protecting our intellectual freedom, privacy, and unfettered access to information, and Tor Project creates software that allows all people to have these rights on the internet.” They point out that this is both an excellent way to educate people on the value of private internet browsing while also being a practical way to expand the Tor network. A test for this initiative is underway at the Kilton Library in Lebanon, New Hampshire, which already has a computing environment full of GNU/Linux machines.

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Urthecast Brings You Earth Images and Videos from the ISS (Video)

Most of us probably won’t ever visit the International Space Station (ISS) and look down at the Earth (motto: “The only planet we know has beer, so let’s not ruin it”). Looking at pictures and videos made by cameras mounted on the ISS is about as close as we’re going to get. There’s already an ISS HD Earth Viewing Experiment on Ustream, but Urthecast is putting out higher-definition images than what you see on Ustream, and has plans to put out even clearer images and video before long. While Urthecast is likely to accumulate plenty of “oohs” and “aahhs” as it rolls along, according to CEO Scott Larson their real objective is to sell imagery — and not necessarily just from the visible light band of the overall spectrum — to industrial and government users. People like us are still invited to look at (and marvel at) lovely images of our planetary home.

NOTE: Today’s video is about 4:30 long. If you want to watch and listen to more of Mr. Larson, we have a second “bonus” (Flash) video for you. Or you can read the transcript, which covers both videos.

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Will Autonomous Cars Be the Insurance Industry’s Napster Moment?

An anonymous reader writes: Most of us are looking forward to the advent of autonomous vehicles. Not only will they free up a lot of time previously spent staring at the bumper of the car in front of you, they’ll also presumably make commuting a lot safer. While that’s great news for the 30,000+ people who die in traffic accidents every year in the U.S. alone, it may not be great news for insurance companies. Granted, they’ll have to pay out a lot less money with the lower number of claims, but premiums will necessarily drop as well and the overall amount of money within the car insurance system will dwindle. Analysts are warning these companies that their business is going to shrink. It will be interesting to see if they adapt to the change, or cling desperately to an outdated business model like the entertainment industry did. “One opportunity for the industry could be selling more coverage to carmakers and other companies developing the automated features for cars. … When the technology fails, manufacturers could get stuck with big liabilities that they will want to cover by buying more insurance. There’s also a potential for cars to get hacked as they become more networked.”

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Dave Grohl Responds To The 1,000-Person Cover Of 'Learn To Fly'

There are about 100,000 people living in Cesena, Italy. 1,000 of them came together to cover a Foo Fighters song, as a request the band play in their city — so Dave Grohl answered, in Italian no less, to give his gratitude, and promise that the Foos will soon have a gig in Cesena.
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Ebola Vaccine 100% Successful In Guinea Trial

An anonymous reader writes: Doctors and researchers have been testing a vaccine to protect against Ebola in the west African nation of Guinea. Trials involving 4,000 people have now shown a 100% success rate in preventing infection. “When Ebola flared up in a village, researchers vaccinated all the contacts of the sick person who were willing — the family, friends and neighbors — and their immediate contacts. Children, adolescents and pregnant women were excluded because of an absence of safety data for them. In practice about 50% of people in these clusters were vaccinated. To test how well the vaccine protected people, the cluster outbreaks were randomly assigned either to receive the vaccine immediately or three weeks after Ebola was confirmed. Among the 2,014 people vaccinated immediately, there were no cases of Ebola from 10 days after vaccination — allowing time for immunity to develop — according to the results published online in the Lancet medical journal (PDF). In the clusters with delayed vaccination, there were 16 cases out of 2,380.”

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John Hughes' Original National Lampoon Vacation Story That Started The Movie Franchise

In 1979, National Lampoon magazine published the future director’s fictitious tale of a family trip gone horribly awry. The Hollywood Reporter reprints the tale that launched an iconic movie series.
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NASA’s Drone For Other Worlds

An anonymous reader writes: A group of engineers is building a new drone. What sets this apart from the hundreds of other drone development projects going on around the world? Well, these engineers are at the Kennedy Space Center, and the drone will be used to gather samples on other worlds. The drone is specifically designed to be able to fly in low- or no-atmosphere situations. Senior technologist Rob Mueller describes it as a “prospecting robot.” He says, “The first step in being able to use resources on Mars or an asteroid is to find out where the resources are. They are most likely in hard-to-access areas where there is permanent shadow. Some of the crater walls are angled 30 degrees or more, and that’s far too steep for a traditional rover to navigate and climb.” They face major challenges with rotor and gas-jet design, they have to figure out navigation without GPS, and the whole system needs to be largely autonomous — you can’t really steer a drone yourself with a latency of several minutes (or more).

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