‘Moth Eye’ Graphene Breakthrough Could Create Indoor Solar Cells

A scientific breakthrough with the “wonder material” graphene has opened up the possibility of indoor solar cells that capture energy from indirect sunlight, as well as ambient energy from household devices. Researchers from the University of Surrey in the U.K. studied the eyes of moths to create sheets of graphene that they claim is the most light-absorbent material ever created. “We realized that the moth’s eye works in a particular way that traps electromagnetic waves very efficiently,” Professor Ravi Silva, head of the Advanced Technology Institute at the University of Surrey, tells Newsweek. “As a result of our studies, we’ve been able to mimic the surface of a moth’s eye and create an amazingly thin, efficient, light-absorbent material made of graphene.”

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How Do You Prosecute An Internet Troll?

On May 3, 2015, two men dressed in body armor and armed with assault rifles approached the Culwell Event Center in the Dallas suburb of Garland, Texas where 200 people had gathered for a Prophet Muhammed Art Exhibit and Cartoon Contest. A month later, Australi Witness posted a statement, claiming credit. But who was he?
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Inside The Topless Sisterhood

As a young dancer with feminist tendencies, Bee Rowlatt was scandalized to find herself on stage alongside topless dancers. Many years later, after writing a book about early feminist Mary Wollstonecraft, she visited the Moulin Rouge in Paris to talk to dancers who bare their breasts in this unforgiving industry.
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Researchers Claim Success In Removing HIV From Living Cells

ffkom writes: A recent publication from German researchers claims success in removing the HI-Virus from living cells, showing a way to completely cure AIDS rather than just suppressing its symptoms (by lowering the amount of viruses) by permanent medication: “Current combination antiretroviral therapies (cART) efficiently suppress HIV-1 reproduction in humans, but the virus persists as integrated proviral reservoirs in small numbers of cells. To generate an antiviral agent capable of eradicating the provirus from infected cells, we employed 145 cycles of substrate-linked directed evolution to evolve a recombinase (Brec1) that site-specifically recognizes a 34-bp sequence present in the long terminal repeats (LTRs) of the majority of the clinically relevant HIV-1 strains and subtypes. Brec1 efficiently, precisely and safely removes the integrated provirus from infected cells and is efficacious on clinical HIV-1 isolates in vitro and in vivo, including in mice humanized with patient-derived cells. Our data suggest that Brec1 has potential for clinical application as a curative HIV-1 therapy.”
Clinical trials are expected to start in Hamburg, Germany, soon.

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Yelp Employee Posts Open Letter About Cost Of Living And Low Wages, Gets Fired.

whoever57 writes: Talia Jane was employed by Yelp in San Francisco but after posting in an open letter to Yelp’s CEO, Jeremy Stoppelman, that her after tax income of $ 8.15 was insufficient to provide basic necessities like heating, food, etc., she discovered that she had been fired. How did she discover? Her work email stopped working. Even her boss did not know what had happened. Stoppelman denies having a hand in her firing, making the claim “(There are) two sides to every HR story so Twitter army please put down the pitchforks,” replying to the criticism. He didn’t personally turn off her email, perhaps he did not even make the decision to fire her, but as the person who ultimately sets the culture and policies of the company, his claim to not be directly responsible is unconvincing.

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