New Site Checks Your Browser’s Fingerprint

“Does your web browser have a unique fingerprint? If so your web browser could be tracked across websites without techniques such as tracking cookies…” warns a new site created by the University of Adelaide and ACEMS, adding “the anonymization aspects of services such as Tor or VPNs could be negated if sites you visit track you using your browser fingerprint.” AnonymousCube contacted Slashdot about their free browser fingerprinting test suite:
On the site you can see what data can be used to track you and how unique your fingerprint is. The site includes new tests, such as detecting software such as Privacy Badger, via how social media buttons are disabled, and CSS only (no JavaScript or flash) tests to get screen size and installed fonts.

If you’re serious about privacy, you might want to test the uniqueness of your browser’s fingerprint.

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Using VPN in UAE Could Cost You $545,000

An anonymous reader writes: The President of the United Arab Emirates has issued a series of new federal laws relating to IT crimes, including a regulation that forbids anyone in the UAE from making use of virtual private networks to secure their web traffic from prying eyes. The new law states that anyone who uses a VPN or proxy server can be imprisoned and fined between $ 136,000-$ 545,000 if they are found to use VPNs fraudulently. Previously, the law was restricted to prosecuting people who used VPNs as part of an internet crime, but UK-based VPN and privacy advocate Private Internet Access says that the law has now changed to enable police in the UAE to go after anyone who uses VPNs to access blocked services, which is considered to be fraudulent use of an IP address.

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Once Valued at $125B, Yahoo’s Web Assets To Be Sold To Verizon For $4.83B, Companies Confirm

The reports were spot on. Verizon Communications on Monday announced that it plans to purchase Yahoo’s Web assets for a sum of $ 4.83 billion in cash. The multi-billion dollars deal will get Verizon Yahoo’s core internet business and some real estate. The announcement also marks a remarkable fall for the Silicon Valley web pioneer, which once had a market capitalization of more than $ 125 billion. For Verizon, the deal adds another piece to the mammoth digital media and advertising empire it owns. The deal is expected to close early 2017. CNBC reports: The transaction is seen boosting Verizon’s AOL internet business, which the company acquired last year for $ 4.4 billion, by giving it access to Yahoo’s advertising technology tools, as well as other assets such as search, mail, messenger and real estate. It also marks the end of Yahoo as an operating company, leaving it only as the owner of a 35.5 percent stake in Yahoo Japan, as well as its 15 percent interest in Chinese e-commerce company Alibaba. In December, Yahoo scrapped plans to spin off its Alibaba stake after investors worried about whether that transaction could have been carried out on a tax-free basis. It instead decided to explore a sale of its core assets, spurred on by activist hedge fund Starboard Value. Forbes has called it one of the “saddest $ 5B deals in tech history.”Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer, who was expected to leave — or get fired — said she intends to stay. “For me personally, I’m planning to stay,” Mayer said in a note on Yahoo’s Tumblr page. “I love Yahoo, and I believe in all of you. It’s important to me to see Yahoo into its next chapter.”

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