Inside America’s Maddening Gun-Tracing System

There’s no telling how many guns we have in America — and when one gets used in a crime, no way for the cops to connect it to its owner. The only place the police can turn for help is a Kafkaesque agency in West Virginia, where, thanks to the gun lobby, computers are illegal and detective work is absurdly antiquated.
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How Security Experts Are Protecting Their Own Data

Today the San Jose Mercury News asked several prominent security experts which security products they were actually using for their own data. An anonymous Slashdot reader writes:
The EFF’s chief technologist revealed that he doesn’t run an anti-virus program, partly because he’s using Linux, and partly because he feels anti-virus software creates a false sense of security. (“I don’t like to get complacent and rely on it in any way…”) He does regularly encrypt his e-mail, “but he doesn’t recommend that average users scramble their email, because he thinks the encryption software is just too difficult to use.”

The newspaper also interviewed security expert Eugene Spafford, who rarely updates the operating system on one of his computers — because it’s not connected to the internet — and sometimes even accesses his files with a virtual machine, which he then deletes when he’s done. His home router is equipped with a firewall device, and “he’s developed some tools in his research center that he uses to try to detect security problems,” according to the article. “There are some additional things I do,” Spafford added, telling the reporter that “I’m not going to give details of all of them, because that doesn’t help me.”

Bruce Schneier had a similar answer. When the reporter asked how he protected his data, Schneier wouldn’t tell them, adding “I’m kind of a target…”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


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Apple Patenting a Way To Collect Fingerprints, Photos of Thieves

An anonymous reader quotes a report from Apple Insider: As published by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, Apple’s invention covering “Biometric capture for unauthorized user identification” details the simple but brilliant — and legally fuzzy — idea of using an iPhone or iPad’s Touch ID module, camera and other sensors to capture and store information about a potential thief. Apple’s patent is also governed by device triggers, though different constraints might be applied to unauthorized user data aggregation. For example, in one embodiment a single failed authentication triggers the immediate capture of fingerprint data and a picture of the user. In other cases, the device might be configured to evaluate the factors that ultimately trigger biometric capture based on a set of defaults defined by internal security protocols or the user. Interestingly, the patent application mentions machine learning as a potential solution for deciding when to capture biometric data and how to manage it. Other data can augment the biometric information, for example time stamps, device location, speed, air pressure, audio data and more, all collected and logged as background operations. The deemed unauthorized user’s data is then either stored locally on the device or sent to a remote server for further evaluation.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


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