Get Real, Microsoft: If the New Surface Pro Is a Laptop, Bundle It With a Type Cover

An anonymous reader shares an article: If Microsoft sold cars like it’s trying to sell its Surface Pro (2017), it would charge extra for wheels — and would be laughed out of the market. But Microsoft’s using this tactic to sell its new Windows tablet as a “laptop,” and we’re still trying to figure out why. Microsoft’s Surface Pro is clearly a Windows tablet, just like its predecessor, the Surface Pro 4. Nevertheless, devices chief Panos Panay calls it a “laptop” no fewer than three times in his blog post, including the very first sentence. No “laptop” or notebook PC forgoes a keyboard, however, as the Surface Pro does. Long-time Surface fans may know that Microsoft charges $ 129 to $ 159 more for that accessory, but does the average buyer get it? That’s where the confusion starts.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Slashdot

A Third of the Nation’s Honeybee Colonies Died Last Year

A third of the honeybees in the United States were lost over the last year, part of a decade-long die-off experts said may threaten our food supply. USA Today reports: The annual survey of roughly 5,000 beekeepers showed the 33% dip from April 2016 to April 2017. The decrease is small compared to the survey’s previous 10 years, when the decrease hovered at roughly 40%. From 2012 to 2013, nearly half of the nation’s colonies died. The death of a colony doesn’t necessarily mean a loss of bees, explains vanEngelsdorp, a project director at the Bee Informed Partnership. A beekeeper can salvage a dead colony, but doing so comes at labor and productivity costs. That causes beekeepers to charge farmers more for pollinating crops and creates a scarcity of bees available for pollination. It’s a trend that threatens beekeepers trying to make a living and could lead to a drop-off in fruits and nuts reliant on pollination, vanEngelsdor said. So what’s killing the honeybees? Parasites, diseases, poor nutrition, and pesticides among many others. The chief killer is the varroa mite, a “lethal parasite,” which researchers said spreads among colonies.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Slashdot

Greg Gianforte, Republican candidate in Montana special election, allegedly body-slams reporter

Greg Gianforte, Republican candidate in Montana special election, allegedly body-slams reporterOn the eve of a special election to fill Montana’s House seat, the Republican candidate allegedly assaulted a journalist.



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

When AI Botches Your Medical Diagnosis, Who’s To Blame?

Robert Hart has posed an interested question in his report on Quartz: When artificial intelligence botches your medical diagnosis, who’s to blame? Do you blame the AI, designer or organization? It’s just one of many questions popping up and starting to be seriously pondered by experts as artificial intelligence and automation continue to become more entwined into our daily lives. From the report: The prospect of being diagnosed by an AI might feel foreign and impersonal at first, but what if you were told that a robot physician was more likely to give you a correct diagnosis? Medical error is currently the third leading cause of death in the U.S., and as many as one in six patients in the British NHS receive incorrect diagnoses. With statistics like these, it’s unsurprising that researchers at Johns Hopkins University believe diagnostic errors to be “the next frontier for patient safety.” Of course, there are downsides. AI raises profound questions regarding medical responsibility. Usually when something goes wrong, it is a fairly straightforward matter to determine blame. A misdiagnosis, for instance, would likely be the responsibility of the presiding physician. A faulty machine or medical device that harms a patient would likely see the manufacturer or operator held to account. What would this mean for an AI?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Slashdot

Gingrich disproves the whole Trump-Russia thing, based on an unsolved murder on a Washington street

Gingrich disproves the whole Trump-Russia thing, based on an unsolved murder on a Washington streetThe District of Columbia police say Rich, who was shot in the back at 4 a.m. near his home in northwest Washington, was the victim of a botched robbery.



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines