HP Patents ‘Reminder Messages’

Daniel Nazer reports via the Electronic Frontier Foundation: On July 25, 2017, the Patent Office issued a patent to HP on reminder messages. Someone needs to remind the Patent Office to look at the real world before issuing patents. United States Patent No. 9,715,680 (the ‘680 patent) is titled “Reminder messages.” While the patent application does suggest some minor tweaks to standard automated reminders, none of these supposed additions deserve patent protection. Although this claim uses some obscure language (like “non-transitory computer-readable storage medium” and “article data”), it describes a quite mundane process. The “article data” is simply additional information associated with an event. For example, “buy a cake” might be included with a birthday reminder. The patent also requires that this extra information be input via a “scanning operation” (e.g. scanning a QR code). The ‘680 patent comes from an application filed in July 2012. It is supposed to represent a non-obvious advance on technology that existed before that date. Of course, reminder messages were standard many years before the application was filed. And just a few minutes of research reveals that QR codes were already used to encode information for reminder messages. The Patent Office reviewed HP’s application for years without ever considering any real-world products. Indeed, the examiner considered only patents and patent applications.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Slashdot