Sony Blocks Yet Another Game From Cross-Console Play With Xbox One

“Back in June, Sony told Eurogamer that the company did not have ‘a profound philosophical stance’ against letting PS4 users play games with those on other platforms,” reports Ars Technica. “That said, the company’s continued refusal to allow for cross-console play between PS4 and Xbox One players has become an absolute and unmistakable trend in recent months.” The latest game to be denied by Sony for cross-console play is Ark: Survival Evolved, which comes out of a two-year early access period next week on Windows, Mac, PS4, and Xbox One. From the report: In a Twitter response posted over the weekend, Ark lead designer and programmer Jeremy Stieglitz said that cross-platform play between PS4 and Xbox One is “working internally, but currently Sony won’t allow it.” This isn’t a huge surprise, considering that the developers of Rocket League, Minecraft, and Gwent have made similar statements in recent months. Since Microsoft very publicly opened Xbox Live to easy cross-platform play back in March, Sony has said that it’s “happy to have a conversation” about the issue, but it has failed to follow through by allowing any linkage between the two competing consoles (cross-platform play between the PS4 and PC has been available in certain games since the PS4’s launch, though).

The question continues to be why, exactly, Sony seems so reluctant to allow any games to work between its own PlayStation Network and Microsoft’s Xbox Live. Speaking with Eurogamer in June, Sony’s Jim Ryan suggested that, in the case of Minecraft, Sony was wary to expose that game’s young players to “external influences we have no ability to manage or look after.” Ryan also told Eurogamer that cross-platform decisions were “a commercial discussion between ourselves and other stakeholders.” That suggests there may be some financial issues between the parties involved that are preventing cross-console play from moving forward. Perhaps Sony wants someone else to pay for the work required to get its network talking to Microsoft’s? The bottom line, though, might be that Sony just doesn’t want to partially give away its sizable advantage in console sales by letting Microsoft hook into that vast network of players.

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After 15 Years, Maine’s Laptops-in-Schools Initiative Fails To Raise Test Scores

For years Maine has been offering laptops to high school students — but is it doing more harm than good? An anonymous reader writes:
One high school student says “We hardly ever use paper,” while another student “says he couldn’t imagine social studies class without his laptop and Internet connection. ‘I don’t think I could do it, honestly… I don’t want to look at a newspaper. I don’t even know where to get a newspaper!'” But then the reporter visits a political science teacher who “learned what a lot of teachers, researchers and policymakers in Maine have come to realize over the past 15 years: You can’t just put a computer in a kid’s hand and expect it to change learning.”

“Research has shown that ‘one-to-one’ programs, meaning one student one computer, implemented the right way, increase student learning in subjects like writing, math and science. Those results have prompted other states, like Utah and Nevada, to look at implementing their own one-to-one programs in recent years. Yet, after a decade and a half, and at a cost of about $ 12 million annually (around one percent of the state’s education budget), Maine has yet to see any measurable increases on statewide standardized test scores.”

The article notes that Maine de-emphasized teacher training which could’ve produced better results. One education policy researcher “says this has created a new kind of divide in Maine. Students in larger schools, with more resources, have learned how to use their laptops in more creative ways. But in Maine’s higher poverty and more rural schools, many students are still just using programs like PowerPoint and Microsoft Word.”

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Deadly Drug-Resistant Fungus Sparks Outbreaks In UK

An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: More than 200 patients in more than 55 UK hospitals were discovered by healthcare workers to be infected or colonized by the multi-drug resistant fungus Candida auris, a globally emerging yeast pathogen that has experts nervous. Three of the hospitals experienced large outbreaks, which as of Monday were all declared officially over by health authorities there. No deaths have been reported since the fungus was first detected in the country in 2013, but 27 affected patients have developed blood infections, which can be life-threatening. And about a quarter of the more than 200 cases were clinical infections. Officials in the UK aimed to assuage fear of the fungus and assure patients that hospitals were safe. “Our enhanced surveillance shows a low risk to patients in healthcare settings. Most cases detected have not shown symptoms or developed an infection as a result of the fungus,” Dr Colin Brown, of Public Health England’s national infection service, told the BBC. Yet, public health experts are uneasy about the rapid emergence and level of drug resistance the pathogen is showing. In a surveillance update in July, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said that C. auris “presents a serious global health threat.” It was first identified in the ear of a patient in Japan in 2009. Since then, it has spread swiftly, showing up in more than a dozen countries, including the U.S., according to the CDC. So far, health officials have reported around 100 infections in nine U.S. states and more than 100 other cases where the fungus was detected but wasn’t causing an infection.

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Why AI Won’t Take Over The Earth

Law professor Ryan Calo — sometimes called a robot-law scholar — hosted the first White House workshop on AI policy, and has organized AI workshops for the National Science Foundation (as well as the Department of Homeland Security and the National Academy of Sciences). Now an anonymous reader shares a new 30-page essay where Calo “explains what policymakers should be worried about with respect to artificial intelligence. Includes a takedown of doomsayers like Musk and Gates.” Professor Calo summarizes his sense of the current consensus on many issues, including the dangers of an existential threat from superintelligent AI:

Claims of a pending AI apocalypse come almost exclusively from the ranks of individuals such as Musk, Hawking, and Bostrom who possess no formal training in the field… A number of prominent voices in artificial intelligence have convincingly challenged Superintelligence’s thesis along several lines. First, they argue that there is simply no path toward machine intelligence that rivals our own across all contexts or domains… even if we were able eventually to create a superintelligence, there is no reason to believe it would be bent on world domination, unless this were for some reason programmed into the system. As Yann LeCun, deep learning pioneer and head of AI at Facebook colorfully puts it, computers don’t have testosterone…. At best, investment in the study of AI’s existential threat diverts millions of dollars (and billions of neurons) away from research on serious questions… “The problem is not that artificial intelligence will get too smart and take over the world,” computer scientist Pedro Domingos writes, “the problem is that it’s too stupid and already has.”

A footnote also finds a paradox in the arguments of Nick Bostrom, who has warned of that dangers superintelligent AI — but also of the possibility that we’re living in a computer simulation. “If AI kills everyone in the future, then we cannot be living in a computer simulation created by our decedents. And if we are living in a computer simulation created by our decedents, then AI didn’t kill everyone. I think it a fair deduction that Professor Bostrom is wrong about something.”

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China’s VPN Developers Face Crackdown

China recently launched a crackdown on the use of software which allows users to get around its heavy internet censorship. Now as the BBC reports, developers are facing growing pressure. From the report: The three plain-clothes policemen tracked him down using a web address. They came to his house and demanded to see his computer. They told him to take down the app he was selling on Apple’s App Store, and filmed it as it was happening. His crime was to develop and sell a piece of software that allows people to get round the tough restrictions that limit access to the internet in China. A virtual private network (VPN) uses servers abroad to provide a secure link to the internet. It’s essential in China if you want to access parts of the outside world like Facebook, Gmail or YouTube, all of which are blocked on the mainland. “They insisted they needed to see my computer,” the software developer, who didn’t want us to use his name, told us during a phone interview. “I said this is my private stuff. How can you search as you please?” No warrant was produced and when he asked them what law he had violated they didn’t say. Initially he refused to co-operate but, fearing detention, he relented. Then they told him what they wanted: “If you take the app off the shelf from Apple’s App Store then this will be all over.” ‘Sorry, I can’t help you with that’. Up until a few months ago his was a legal business. Then the government changed the regulations. VPN sellers need a licence now.

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Cisco Meraki Loses Customer Data in Engineering Gaffe

Cisco has admitted to losing customer data during a configuration change its enginners applied to its Meraki cloud managed IT service. From a report: Specific data uploaded to Cisco Meraki before 11:20 am PT last Thursday was deleted after engineers created an erroneous policy in a configuration change to its US object storage service, Cisco admitted on Friday. The company did say that the issue has been fixed, and while the error will not affect network operations in most cases, it admitted the faulty policy “but will be an inconvenience as some of your data may have been lost.” Cisco hasn’t said how many of its 140,000+ Meraki customers have been affected. The deleted data includes custom floor plans, logos, enterprise apps and voicemail greetings found on users’ dashboard, systems manager and phones. The engineering team was working over the weekend to find out whether the data can be recovered and potentially build tools so that customers can find out what data has been lost.

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The FCC Is Full Again, With Three Republicans and Two Democrats

An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: The U.S. Senate today confirmed the nominations of Republican Brendan Carr and Democrat Jessica Rosenworcel to fill the two empty seats on the Federal Communications Commission. FCC Chairman Ajit Pai congratulated the commissioners in a statement. “As I know from working with each of them for years, they have distinguished records of public service and will be valuable assets to the FCC in the years to come,” Pai said. “Their experience at the FCC makes them particularly well-suited to hit the ground running. I’m pleased that the FCC will once again be at full strength and look forward to collaborating to close the digital divide, promote innovation, protect consumers, and improve the agency’s operations.”

Carr served as Pai’s Wireless, Public Safety and International Legal Advisor for three years. After President Trump elevated Pai to the chairmanship in January, Pai appointed Carr to become the FCC’s general counsel. Rosenworcel had to leave the commission at the end of last year when the Republican-led US Senate refused to re-confirm her for a second five-year term. But Democrats pushed Trump to re-nominate Rosenworcel to fill the empty Democratic spot and he obliged. FCC commissioners are nominated by the president and confirmed by the Senate. esides Pai, Carr, and Rosenworcel, the five-member commission includes Republican Michael O’Rielly and Democrat Mignon Clyburn.

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HP Patents ‘Reminder Messages’

Daniel Nazer reports via the Electronic Frontier Foundation: On July 25, 2017, the Patent Office issued a patent to HP on reminder messages. Someone needs to remind the Patent Office to look at the real world before issuing patents. United States Patent No. 9,715,680 (the ‘680 patent) is titled “Reminder messages.” While the patent application does suggest some minor tweaks to standard automated reminders, none of these supposed additions deserve patent protection. Although this claim uses some obscure language (like “non-transitory computer-readable storage medium” and “article data”), it describes a quite mundane process. The “article data” is simply additional information associated with an event. For example, “buy a cake” might be included with a birthday reminder. The patent also requires that this extra information be input via a “scanning operation” (e.g. scanning a QR code). The ‘680 patent comes from an application filed in July 2012. It is supposed to represent a non-obvious advance on technology that existed before that date. Of course, reminder messages were standard many years before the application was filed. And just a few minutes of research reveals that QR codes were already used to encode information for reminder messages. The Patent Office reviewed HP’s application for years without ever considering any real-world products. Indeed, the examiner considered only patents and patent applications.

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Apple Paid Nokia $2 Billion To Escape Fight Over Old Patents

An anonymous reader shares a report: Apple’s latest patent spat with Nokia resulted in a $ 2 billion up-front payment from the iPhone maker, a colossal sum that seems to indicate Apple was eager to avoid a protracted and ugly dispute that could rival the one it had with Samsung. The new details of the settlement, which was first announced back in May without the disclosure of a financial amount or the new licensing terms, were spotted in Nokia’s second quarter earnings release. “We got a substantial upfront cash payment of $ 2 billion from Apple, strengthening further our cash position. As said earlier, our plans is to provide more details on the intended use of cash in conjunction with our Q3 earnings,” reads the official transcript of Nokia’s quarterly earnings call with investors yesterday. Neither Nokia nor Apple have disclosed the terms of the new licensing deal, including whether it involves recurring payments or how many years it will be in place.

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Degenerative Brain Disease Found In Nearly All Donated NFL Player Brains, Says Study

A new study published Tuesday in the journal American Medical Association found that 110 out of 111 brains of those who played in the NFL had degenerative brain disease chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). NPR reports: In the study, researchers examined the brains of 202 deceased former football players at all levels. Nearly 88 percent of all the brains, 177, had CTE. Three of 14 who had played only in high school had CTE, 48 of 53 college players, 9 of 14 semiprofessional players, and 7 of 8 Canadian Football League players. CTE was not found in the brains of two who played football before high school. According to the study’s senior author, Dr. Ann McKee, “this is by far the largest [study] of individuals who developed CTE that has ever been described. And it only includes individuals who are exposed to head trauma by participation in football.” A CTE study several years ago by McKee and her colleagues included football players and athletes from other collision sports such as hockey, soccer and rugby. It also examined the brains of military veterans who had suffered head injuries. The study released Tuesday is the continuation of a study that began eight years ago. In 2015, McKee and fellow researchers at the Department of Veterans Affairs and Boston University published study results revealing 87 of 91 former NFL players had CTE.

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