The FCC Is Full Again, With Three Republicans and Two Democrats

An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: The U.S. Senate today confirmed the nominations of Republican Brendan Carr and Democrat Jessica Rosenworcel to fill the two empty seats on the Federal Communications Commission. FCC Chairman Ajit Pai congratulated the commissioners in a statement. “As I know from working with each of them for years, they have distinguished records of public service and will be valuable assets to the FCC in the years to come,” Pai said. “Their experience at the FCC makes them particularly well-suited to hit the ground running. I’m pleased that the FCC will once again be at full strength and look forward to collaborating to close the digital divide, promote innovation, protect consumers, and improve the agency’s operations.”

Carr served as Pai’s Wireless, Public Safety and International Legal Advisor for three years. After President Trump elevated Pai to the chairmanship in January, Pai appointed Carr to become the FCC’s general counsel. Rosenworcel had to leave the commission at the end of last year when the Republican-led US Senate refused to re-confirm her for a second five-year term. But Democrats pushed Trump to re-nominate Rosenworcel to fill the empty Democratic spot and he obliged. FCC commissioners are nominated by the president and confirmed by the Senate. esides Pai, Carr, and Rosenworcel, the five-member commission includes Republican Michael O’Rielly and Democrat Mignon Clyburn.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Slashdot

Paywalled Science Journals Under Fire Again

The Real Dr John sends this report from The Guardian:
Emeritus professor Stephen Leeder was sacked by the Medical Journal of Australia (MJA) in April after challenging a decision to outsource some of the journal’s functions to the world’s biggest scientific publisher, Elsevier. This month he will address a symposium at the State Library of NSW where academics will discuss how to fight what they describe as the commodification of knowledge. Alex Holcombe, an associate professor of psychology who will also be presenting at the symposium, said the business model of some of the major academic publishers was more profitable than owning a gold mine. Some of the 1,600 titles published by Elsevier charged institutions more than $ 19,000 for an annual subscription to just one journal. The Springer group, which publishes more than 2,000 titles, charges more than $ 21,000 for access to some of its titles. “The mining giant Rio Tinto has a profit margin of about 23%,” Holcombe said. “Elsevier consistently comes in at around 37%. Open access publishing is catching on, but it requires researchers to pay up to $ 3000 to get a single open access article published. What other options are there for making scientific publications available to everyone?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Slashdot

Non-Invasive Spinal Cord Stimulation Gets Paralyzed Legs Moving Again

schwit1 writes: A new technique called transcutaneous stimulation has allowed five men with complete motor paralysis regain the ability to move their legs voluntarily and produce step-like movements. The treatment requires no surgery and adds to prior work to help paralyzed people gain voluntary movement through electrical stimulation (one completed in 2011, the other in 2014). Gizmag reports: “The new treatment uses a technique called transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, which involves strategically placing electrodes on the skin of the lower back. While receiving stimulation, the men’s legs were supported by braces that hung from the ceiling. At first their legs only moved involuntarily, if at all. But they soon found they could voluntarily extend the distance their legs moved during stimulation. They doubled their range of voluntary motion after four treatment sessions.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Slashdot

Air-Gapped Computer Hacked (Again)

An anonymous reader writes: Researchers from Ben Gurion University managed to extract GSM signals from air gapped computers using only a simple cellphone. According to Yuval Elovici, head of the University’s Cyber Security Research Center, the air gap exploit works because of the fundamental way that computers put out low levels of electromagnetic radiation. The attack requires both the targeted computer and the mobile phone to have malware installed on them. Once the malware has been installed on the targeted computer, the attack exploits the natural capabilities of each device to exfiltrate data using electromagnetic radiation.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Slashdot

San Francisco Fiber Optic Cable Cutter Strikes Again

HughPickens.com writes: USA Today reports that the FBI is investigating at least 11 physical attacks on high-capacity Internet cables in California’s San Francisco Bay Area dating back to at least July 6, 2014, including one early this week. “When it affects multiple companies and cities, it does become disturbing,” says Special Agent Greg Wuthrich. “We definitely need the public’s assistance.” The pattern of attacks raises serious questions about the glaring vulnerability of critical Internet infrastructure, says JJ Thompson. “When it’s situations that are scattered all in one geography, that raises the possibility that they are testing out capabilities, response times and impact,” says Thompson. “That is a security person’s nightmare.”

Mark Peterson, a spokesman for Internet provider Wave Broadband, says an unspecified number of Sacramento-area customers were knocked offline by the latest attack. Peterson characterized the Tuesday attack as “coordinated” and said the company was working with Level 3 and Zayo to restore service. It’s possible the vandals were dressed as telecommunications workers to avoid arousing suspicion, say FBI officials. Backup systems help cushion consumers from the worst of the attacks, meaning people may notice slower email or videos not playing, but may not have service completely disrupted. But repairs are costly and penalties are not stiff enough to deter would-be vandals. “There are flags and signs indicating to somebody who wants to do damage: This is where it is folks,” says Richard Doherty. “It’s a terrible social crime that affects thousands and millions of people.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Slashdot