China Arrests Apple Distributors Who Made Millions on iPhone Data

An anonymous reader shares a report: Police in China’s Zhejiang province have arrested 22 (apparently third-party) Apple distributors for allegedly selling iPhone user data. Officials say the workers searched an internal Apple database for sensitive info, such as Apple IDs and phone numbers, and peddled it on the black market for between 10 to 180 yuan with each sale ($ 1.50 to $ 26). All told, the distributors reportedly raked in more than 50 million yuan, about $ 7.36 million, before authorities stepped in.

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Turkey Arrests Journalists For Using Encryption

An anonymous reader sends news that three employees of Vice News were arrested in Turkey because one of them used an encryption system on his personal computer. That particular type of encryption has been used by the terrorist organization known as the Islamic State, so the men were charged with “engaging in terrorist activity.” The head of a local lawyers association said, “I find it ridiculous that they were taken into custody. I don’t believe there is any accuracy to what they are charged for. To me, it seems like an attempt by the government to get international journalists away from the area of conflict.” The Turkish government denied these claims: “This is an unpleasant incident, but the judiciary is moving forward with the investigation independently and, contrary to claims, the government has no role in the proceedings.”

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Two Arrests In Denmark For Spreading Information About Popcorn Time

An anonymous reader writes: You may recall Popcorn Time, the software that integrated torrents with a streaming media player. It fell afoul of the law quite quickly, but survived and stabilized. Now, out of Denmark comes news that two men operating websites related to Popcorn Time have been arrested, and their sites have been shut down. It’s notable because the sites were informational resources, explaining how to use the software. They did not link to any copyright-infringing material, they were not involved with development of Popcorn Time or any of its forks, and they didn’t host the software. “Both men stand accused of distributing knowledge and guides on how to obtain illegal content online and are reported to have confessed.”

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