Democrats ‘haven’t been destroying each other’ in Virginia primary, McAuliffe says. They may be starting.

Democrats ‘haven’t been destroying each other’ in Virginia primary, McAuliffe says. They may be starting.The two Democrats locked in a tight primary contest for governor sprinted around the commonwealth Saturday, hoping to alert enough of their own supporters to the fact that the election will be held Tuesday.



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

Intel Patches Remote Execution Hole That’s Been Hidden In Its Chips Since 2008

Chris Williams reports via The Register: Intel processor chipsets have, for roughly the past nine years, harbored a security flaw that can be exploited to remotely control and infect vulnerable systems with virtually undetectable spyware and other malicious code. Specifically, the bug is in Intel’s Active Management Technology (AMT), Standard Manageability (ISM) and Small Business Technology (SBT) firmware versions 6 to 11.6. According to Chipzilla, the security hole allows “an unprivileged attacker to gain control of the manageability features provided by these products.” That means hackers exploiting the flaw can silently snoop on a vulnerable machine’s users, make changes to files and read them, install rootkits and other malware, and so on. This is possible across the network, or with local access. These management features have been available in various Intel chipsets for years, starting with the Nehalem Core i7 in 2008, all the way up to Kaby Lake Core parts in 2017. According to Intel today, this critical security vulnerability, labeled CVE-2017-5689, was found and reported in March by Maksim Malyutin at Embedi. To get the patch to close the hole, you’ll have to pester your machine’s manufacturer for a firmware update, or try the mitigations here. These updates are hoped to arrive within the next few weeks.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Slashdot

Victim’s family wishes Facebook killer had been captured alive

Victim’s family wishes Facebook killer had been captured aliveThe family of Robert Godwin Sr., the 74-year-old Cleveland man whose apparent random murder was videotaped and posted to Facebook, had hoped the killer would have turned himself in instead of committing suicide.



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

Uranium-Filled ‘Lost Nuke’ Missing Since 1950 May Have Been Found

Although the U.S. government “does not believe the bomb contains active nuclear material,” schwit1 shares this report from the BBC:
A commercial diver may have discovered a lost decommissioned U.S. nuclear bomb off the coast of Canada. Sean Smyrichinsky was diving for sea cucumbers near British Columbia when he discovered a large metal device that looked a bit like a flying saucer. The Canadian Department of National Defence believes it could be a “lost nuke” from a US B-36 bomber that crashed in the area in 1950…. The plane was on a secret mission to simulate a nuclear strike and had a real Mark IV nuclear bomb on board to see if it could carry the payload required…

The American military says the bomb was filled with lead, uranium and TNT but no plutonium, so it wasn’t capable of a nuclear explosion… Several hours into its flight, its engines caught fire and the crew had to parachute to safety… The crew put the plane on autopilot and set it to crash in the middle of the ocean, but three years later, its wreckage was found hundreds of kilometers inland.
The crew says they dumped their bomb-like cargo into the ocean first to avoid a detonation on land.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Slashdot

Facebook’s Free Basics App Has Been Temporarily Banned in India

An anonymous reader writes that Facebook’s plan to provide Indians with free access to a number of chosen internet services has run into some big trouble. FC reports: “Indian telecom regulators have reportedly halted Facebook’s “Free Basics” mobile Internet service, formerly known as Internet.org, over net neutrality concerns. The controversial program allows mobile customers free access to a limited set of Internet services, including certain online shopping, employment and health sites, Wikipedia and, naturally, Facebook itself. While Facebook has said the program offers limited Internet access to more than 1 billion people, those who might otherwise have none, it’s come under fire from net neutrality activists and others in the industry who say it limits users to a walled garden populated solely by Facebook’s partners.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Slashdot

Most Healthcare Managers Admit Their IT Systems Have Been Compromised

Lucas123 writes: Eighty-one percent of healthcare IT managers say their organizations have been compromised by at least one malware, botnet or other kind of cyber attack during the past two years, and only half of those managers feel that they are adequately prepared to prevent future attacks, according to a new survey by KPMG. The KPMG survey polled 223 CIOs, CTOs, chief security officers and chief compliance officers at healthcare providers and health plans, and found 65% indicated malware was most frequently reported line of attack during the past 12 to 24 months. Additionally, those surveyed indicated the areas with the greatest vulnerabilities within their organization include external attackers (65%), sharing data with third parties (48%), employee breaches (35%), wireless computing (35%) and inadequate firewalls (27%). Top among reasons healthcare facilities are facing increased risk, was the adoption of digital patient records and the automation of clinical systems.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Slashdot

Our Early Solar System May Have Been Home To a Fifth Giant Planet

sciencehabit writes: A cluster of icy bodies in the same region as Pluto could be proof that our early solar system was home to a fifth giant planet, according to new research (abstract). That planet may have ‘bumped’ Neptune during its migration away from the sun 4 billion years ago, causing the ice giant to jump into its current orbit and scattering a cluster of its satellites into the Kuiper belt in the outer solar system.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Slashdot