When AI Botches Your Medical Diagnosis, Who’s To Blame?

Robert Hart has posed an interested question in his report on Quartz: When artificial intelligence botches your medical diagnosis, who’s to blame? Do you blame the AI, designer or organization? It’s just one of many questions popping up and starting to be seriously pondered by experts as artificial intelligence and automation continue to become more entwined into our daily lives. From the report: The prospect of being diagnosed by an AI might feel foreign and impersonal at first, but what if you were told that a robot physician was more likely to give you a correct diagnosis? Medical error is currently the third leading cause of death in the U.S., and as many as one in six patients in the British NHS receive incorrect diagnoses. With statistics like these, it’s unsurprising that researchers at Johns Hopkins University believe diagnostic errors to be “the next frontier for patient safety.” Of course, there are downsides. AI raises profound questions regarding medical responsibility. Usually when something goes wrong, it is a fairly straightforward matter to determine blame. A misdiagnosis, for instance, would likely be the responsibility of the presiding physician. A faulty machine or medical device that harms a patient would likely see the manufacturer or operator held to account. What would this mean for an AI?

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Intel’s Software Chief Out; Botched McAfee Deal To Blame?

jfruh writes: Renee James, Intel’s president and head of the company’s software group has departed, supposedly to “pursue other opportunities.” But a high-profile heir apparent doesn’t just leave voluntarily, and it seems likely that she is in part taking the fall for Intel’s acquisition of McAfee, the promised synergies of which have failed to materialize. Intel is a traditionally very stable company, but there’s been a lot of churn in the upper ranks lately.

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