Malaysia Blocking Websites Based On Political Content

An anonymous reader writes: A few days ago Slashdot carried a piece of news from Malaysia whereby [news] websites based in Malaysia must be registered. Now comes the news that Malaysia is actively blocking websites which carry political opinion contrary to those of the ruling elite.
Granted, Malaysia is no US of A nor Europe, but the world must understand that Malaysia is the only country in the world where racial apartheid laws are still being actively practiced — and have received endorsement from the ruling elite which has controlled Malaysia for the past 58 years.

(Wikipedia lists some other candidates for modern-day apartheid in its entry on Contemporary segregation.)

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TPP Copyright Chapter Leaks: Website Blocking, New Criminal Rules On the Way

An anonymous reader writes: Knowledge Ecology International (KEI) [Wednesday] morning released
the May 2015 draft of the copyright provisions in the Trans Pacific
Partnership (copyright,
ISP
annex, enforcement).
The leak appears to be the same version that was covered
by the EFF and other media outlets earlier this summer.
Michael Geist unpacks
the leaked documents, noting the treaty includes
anti-circumvention rules that extend beyond the WIPO Internet
treaties, new criminal rules, the extension of copyright term for
countries like Canada and Japan, increased border measures,
mandatory statutory damages in all countries, and expanding ISP
liability rules, including the prospect of website blocking for
Canada.

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A Plea For Websites To Stop Blocking Password Managers

An anonymous reader writes: Password managers aren’t a security panacea, but experts widely agree that it’s better to use one than to have weak (but easy-to-remember) passwords. Just this week, they were listed as a tool non-experts don’t use as much as experts do. I use one, and a pet peeve of mine is when a website specifically (or through bad design) interferes with the copying and pasting of a password. Thus, I appreciated this rant about it in Wired: “It’s unacceptable that in an age where our lives are increasingly being played out online, and are sometimes only protected by a password, some sites deliberately stop their users from being as secure as possible, for no really justifiable reason.”

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