China’s VPN Developers Face Crackdown

China recently launched a crackdown on the use of software which allows users to get around its heavy internet censorship. Now as the BBC reports, developers are facing growing pressure. From the report: The three plain-clothes policemen tracked him down using a web address. They came to his house and demanded to see his computer. They told him to take down the app he was selling on Apple’s App Store, and filmed it as it was happening. His crime was to develop and sell a piece of software that allows people to get round the tough restrictions that limit access to the internet in China. A virtual private network (VPN) uses servers abroad to provide a secure link to the internet. It’s essential in China if you want to access parts of the outside world like Facebook, Gmail or YouTube, all of which are blocked on the mainland. “They insisted they needed to see my computer,” the software developer, who didn’t want us to use his name, told us during a phone interview. “I said this is my private stuff. How can you search as you please?” No warrant was produced and when he asked them what law he had violated they didn’t say. Initially he refused to co-operate but, fearing detention, he relented. Then they told him what they wanted: “If you take the app off the shelf from Apple’s App Store then this will be all over.” ‘Sorry, I can’t help you with that’. Up until a few months ago his was a legal business. Then the government changed the regulations. VPN sellers need a licence now.

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AT&T, Apple, Google To Work On ‘Robocall’ Crackdown

Last month the FCC had pressed major U.S. phone companies to take immediate steps to develop technology that blocks unwanted automated calls available to consumers at no charge. It had demanded the concerned companies to come up with a “concrete, actionable” plan within 30 days. Well, the companies have complied. On Friday, 30 major technology companies announced they are joining the U.S. government to crack down on automated, pre-recorded telephone calls that regulators have labeled as “scourge.” Reuters adds: AT&T, Alphabet, Apple, Verizon Communications and Comcast are among the members of the “Robocall Strike Force,” which will work with the U.S. Federal Communications Commission. The strike force will report to the commission by Oct. 19 on “concrete plans to accelerate the development and adoption of new tools and solutions,” said AT&T Chief Executive Officer Randall Stephenson, who is chairing the group. The group hopes to put in place Caller ID verification standards that would help block calls from spoofed phone numbers and to consider a “Do Not Originate” list that would block spoofers from impersonating specific phone numbers from governments, banks or others.

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