Cisco Meraki Loses Customer Data in Engineering Gaffe

Cisco has admitted to losing customer data during a configuration change its enginners applied to its Meraki cloud managed IT service. From a report: Specific data uploaded to Cisco Meraki before 11:20 am PT last Thursday was deleted after engineers created an erroneous policy in a configuration change to its US object storage service, Cisco admitted on Friday. The company did say that the issue has been fixed, and while the error will not affect network operations in most cases, it admitted the faulty policy “but will be an inconvenience as some of your data may have been lost.” Cisco hasn’t said how many of its 140,000+ Meraki customers have been affected. The deleted data includes custom floor plans, logos, enterprise apps and voicemail greetings found on users’ dashboard, systems manager and phones. The engineering team was working over the weekend to find out whether the data can be recovered and potentially build tools so that customers can find out what data has been lost.

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Ask Slashdot: Patch Management For Offline Customer Systems?

New submitter Nillerz writes: What, in your experience, is generally the best way to distribute patches in a way so customers can download them, considering that the machines are offline? Are there any software packages (open source preferred) that pretty much allow engineers to upload a patch with a description to a web server, and allow customers with credentials that are registered in LDAP to browse and download them quickly? And if not, how do you distribute patches to air-gapped machines?

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GasBuddy Has a New Privacy Policy (Spoiler: Not As Customer Friendly)

An anonymous reader writes: GasBuddy has been a popular iOS and Android app for the last 5 years used to find the cheapest place to get gas. According to the Google Play store, there are over 10 million installs (in additions to the installs from Apple and Amazon’s appstores). Now that they have a large enough number of users, GasBuddy has updated their privacy policy to allow them to collect more information. Some highlights of the privacy policy changes include: only 10 days for new terms to take effect (previously users were given 30 days to review the changes); collection of “signal strength related to Wifi or Bluetooth functionality, temperature, battery level, and similar technical data”; and [a warning that the company] will not honor a web browser’s “do not track” setting.

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