China’s VPN Developers Face Crackdown

China recently launched a crackdown on the use of software which allows users to get around its heavy internet censorship. Now as the BBC reports, developers are facing growing pressure. From the report: The three plain-clothes policemen tracked him down using a web address. They came to his house and demanded to see his computer. They told him to take down the app he was selling on Apple’s App Store, and filmed it as it was happening. His crime was to develop and sell a piece of software that allows people to get round the tough restrictions that limit access to the internet in China. A virtual private network (VPN) uses servers abroad to provide a secure link to the internet. It’s essential in China if you want to access parts of the outside world like Facebook, Gmail or YouTube, all of which are blocked on the mainland. “They insisted they needed to see my computer,” the software developer, who didn’t want us to use his name, told us during a phone interview. “I said this is my private stuff. How can you search as you please?” No warrant was produced and when he asked them what law he had violated they didn’t say. Initially he refused to co-operate but, fearing detention, he relented. Then they told him what they wanted: “If you take the app off the shelf from Apple’s App Store then this will be all over.” ‘Sorry, I can’t help you with that’. Up until a few months ago his was a legal business. Then the government changed the regulations. VPN sellers need a licence now.

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Samsung Woos Developers As It Eyes Tizen Expansion Beyond Smartphones

New submitter Manish Singh writes: Why is Samsung, the South Korean technology conglomerate which has the tentpole position in Android, becoming increasinglu focused on its homegrown operating system Tizen? At its annual developer summit this week, the company announced new SDKs for smartwatches, smart TVs, and smartphones, and also shared its future roadmap.

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How Developers Can Fight Creeping Mediocrity

Nerval’s Lobster writes: As the Slashdot community well knows, chasing features has never worked out for any software company. “Once management decides that’s where the company is going to live, it’s pretty simple to start counting down to the moment that company will eventually die,” software engineer Zachary Forrest y Salazar writes in a new posting. But how does any developer overcome the management and deadlines that drive a lot of development straight into mediocrity, if not outright ruination? He suggests a damn-the-torpedoes approach: “It’s taking the code into your own hands, building or applying tools to help you ship faster, and prototyping ideas,” whether or not you really have the internal support. But given the management issues and bureaucracy confronting many companies, is this approach feasible?

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Battle For Wesnoth Seeks New Developers

jones_supa writes: Twelve years ago, David White sat down over a weekend and created the small pet project that we know today as the open source strategy game The Battle For Wesnoth. At the time, Dave was the sole programmer, working alongside Francisco Muñoz, who produced the first graphics. As more and more people contributed, the game grew from a tiny personal project into an extensive one, encompassing hundreds of contributors. Today however, the ship is sinking. The project is asking for help to keep things rolling. Especially requested are C++, Python, and gameplay (WML) programmers. Any willing volunteers should have good communication skills and preferably be experienced with working alongside fellow members of a large project. More details can be found at the project website.

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How Developers Can Rebuild Trust On the Internet

snydeq writes: Public keys, trusted hardware, block chains — InfoWorld’s Peter Wayner discusses tech tools developers should be investigating to help secure the Internet for all. ‘The Internet is a pit of epistemological chaos. As Peter Steiner posited — and millions of chuckles peer-reviewed — in his famous New Yorker cartoon, there’s no way to know if you’re swapping packets with a dog or the bank that claims to safeguard your money,’ Wayner writes. ‘We may not be able to wave a wand and make the Internet perfect, but we can certainly add features to improve trust on the Internet. To that end, we offer the following nine ideas for bolstering a stronger sense of assurance that our data, privacy, and communications are secure.’

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