Victim’s family wishes Facebook killer had been captured alive

Victim’s family wishes Facebook killer had been captured aliveThe family of Robert Godwin Sr., the 74-year-old Cleveland man whose apparent random murder was videotaped and posted to Facebook, had hoped the killer would have turned himself in instead of committing suicide.



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TransferWise Launches International Money Transfers Via Facebook

Money transfer company TransferWise has launched a new service that allows users to send money internationally through Facebook’s Messenger, as competition in the digital payments landscape intensifies. From a report on Reuters: The London-based startup said on Tuesday that it had developed a Facebook Messenger “chatbot”, or an automated program that can help users communicate with businesses and carry out tasks such as online purchases. TransferWise’s chatbot enables customers to send money to friends and family to and from the United States, Britain, Canada, Australia and Europe from Facebook Messenger. It can also be used to set up exchange rate alerts. Facebook already allows its users to send money domestically in the United States via its Messenger app, but has not yet launched similar services internationally. TransferWise said its service will be the first to enable international money transfers entirely within Messenger.

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Germany Threatens To Fine Facebook Over Hate Speech

An anonymous reader quotes a report from ABC News: German officials are stepping up their criticism of Facebook, saying the social network is doing too little to stop hate speech and could face stiff fines unless it deletes illegal content faster. In an interview published Friday, Justice Minister Heiko Maas said his ministry was checking whether it would be possible to make social networking sites legally liable for illegal posts. Germany has seen a sharp increase in vitriolic posts on social media in recent years amid a heated public debate over the influx of more than a million migrants since the start of 2015. The country has laws against speech deemed to be racist, defamatory or inciting violence — a response to Germany’s Nazi legacy. But authorities have struggled with the deluge of often anonymous postings on foreign-owned websites. Thomas Oppermann, a senior lawmaker in Maas’ Social Democratic Party, told German weekly Der Spiegel that dominant social media sites like Facebook could be required to delete illegal posts within 24 hours or face fines up to 500,000 euros ($ 522,000). Facebook also could be compelled to distribute corrections that reach the same number of people as the original post, Oppermann suggested, something traditional media companies in Germany are already required to do.

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Nielsen Adds Facebook To Social TV Ratings

New submitter AnneMackay451 writes with news that the Nielsen media audience measuring company will now include social media buzz into its ratings. From the article: “Nielsen wants to know what TV shows are getting the biggest buzz on Facebook. The measurement firm is expanding its Twitter TV Ratings to include data from Facebook and, eventually, Instagram. The new reports are being rebranded as Nielsen’s Social Content Ratings. The new ratings will measure online buzz about TV programs and streaming originals when they launch later this year. Social conversations will be measured both during a show’s airtime and 24-hours-a-day.”

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Facebook Thinks Occlusion Is the Next Great Frontier For Image Recognition

An anonymous reader writes: Researchers at Facebook AI Research (FAIR) have published a paper contending that image recognition research is now advanced enough to consider the problem of occlusion, wherein the objects AI must identify are either partially cropped or partially hidden. Their solution is the predictably labor-expensive route of human annotation of existing image-set databases, in this case ‘finishing off’ occluded objects with vector outlines and assigning them a z-order. This article looks at the practical and even philosophical problems of getting IR algorithms to ‘guess’ objects usefully, and asks whether practical IR research might not be currently limited both by the use of over-specific image datasets and — in the field of neural networks — by problems of theory and limited ‘local’ processing power in critical real-time situations.

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Germany Wants Facebook To Obey Its Rules About Holocaust Denial

Bruce66423 writes: In a classic example of the conflict of cultures bought about by the internet, Germany is trying to get Facebook to obey its rules about banning holocaust denial posts. From the linked Jerusalem Post article:

[Justice Minister Heiko] Maas, who has accused Facebook of doing too little to thwart racist and hate posts on its social media platform, said that Germany has zero tolerance for such expression and expects the US-based company to be more vigilant. “One thing is clear: if Facebook wants to do business in Germany, then it must abide by German laws,” Maas told Reuters. “It doesn’t matter that we, because of historical reasons, have a stricter interpretation of freedom of speech than the United States does.” “Holocaust denial and inciting racial hatred are crimes in Germany and it doesn’t matter if they’re posted on Facebook or uttered out in the public on the market square,” he added. … “There’s no scope for misplaced tolerance towards internet users who spread racist propaganda. That’s especially the case in light of our German history.”

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Facebook Is Now Working On Its Own Digital Assistant Called M

Mark Wilson writes: Sounding like a character from a James Bond movie, M is Facebook’s personal digital assistant. Ready to compete with the likes of Cortana, M will live inside Facebook Messenger and take artificial intelligence a step further. Rather than just helping you to find information or create calendar entries, M will actually perform tasks on your behalf. Once up and running, M will be able to book restaurants for you, purchase shopping, and more. It will also be possible to use the service to ask for advice — such as looking for somewhere to visit nearby, or gift suggestions — and Facebook says the AI behind M is “trained and supervised by people”.

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Daniel Wolfe Is Killing Himself Live On Facebook

Daniel Wolfe’s backpack contains most of what he’s got left. Discharge papers. Records from Veterans Affairs hospitals in two states. Old warrants for his arrest. He’s got a V.A.-issued pamphlet on “Pain and Pain Management” and an appointment card for “Mandatory Suicide Prevention Education,” dated three months ago. He’s got a bottle of Jack Daniel’s, a cell phone, and a box cutter.
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