Former FBI Director Predicts Russian Hackers Will Interfere With More Elections

An anonymous reader quotes the New York Times:
James B. Comey, the former director of the F.B.I., testified that the Russians had not only intervened in last year’s election, but would try to do it again… Russian hackers did not just breach Democratic email accounts; according to Mr. Comey, they orchestrated a “massive effort” targeting hundreds of — and possibly more than 1,000 — American government and private organizations since 2015… As F.B.I. director, he supervised counterintelligence investigations into computer break-ins that harvested emails from the State Department and the White House, and that penetrated deep into the computer systems of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Yet President Barack Obama’s administration did not want to publicize those intrusions, choosing to handle them diplomatically — perhaps because at the time they looked more like classic espionage than an effort to manipulate American politics…
Graham Allison, a longtime Russia scholar at Harvard, said, “Russia’s cyberintrusion into the recent presidential election signals the beginning of what is almost sure to be an intensified cyberwar in which both they — and we — seek to participate in picking the leaders of an adversary.” The difference, he added, is that American elections are generally fair, so “we are much more vulnerable to such manipulation than is Russia,” where results are often preordained… Similar warnings have been issued by others in the intelligence community, led by James R. Clapper Jr., who has sounded the alarm since retiring in January as director of national intelligence. “I don’t think people have their head around the scope of what the Russians are doing,” he said recently.
Daniel Fried, a career diplomat who oversaw sanctions imposed on Russia before retiring this year, told the Times that Comey “was spot-on right that Russia is coming after us, but not just the U.S., but the free world in general. And we need to take this seriously.”

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‘We’re in impeachment territory’: David Gergen, former presidential adviser, on Comey’s Trump memo

‘We’re in impeachment territory’: David Gergen, former presidential adviser, on Comey’s Trump memo“After watching the Clinton impeachment, I thought I would never see another one,” David Gergen said on CNN.



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Former Obama chief of staff: The president cannot, does not and did not order a wiretap

Former Obama chief of staff: The president cannot, does not and did not order a wiretapThe chief of staff for former President Barack Obama says President Trump’s claim that Obama ordered wiretapping at Trump Tower ahead of the 2016 the election is just plain wrong. “The president cannot order a wiretap,” Denis McDonough, who served as Obama’s chief of staff throughout his second term, said on “CBS This Morning” on Thursday. “The president does not order a wiretap.



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Former Apple CEO Creates an IPhone Competitor

An anonymous reader links to Fast Company’s profile of Obi Worldphone, one-time Apple CEO John Sculley’s venture into smartphones. The company’s first two products (both reasonably spec’d, moderately priced Android phones) are expected to launch in October. And though the phones are obviously running a different operating system than Apple’s, Sculley says that Obi is a similarly design-obsessed company:

“The hardest part of the design was not coming up with cool-looking designs,” Sculley says. “It was sweating the details over in the Chinese factories, who just were not accustomed to having this quality of finish, all of these little details that make a beautiful design. We had teams over in China, working for months on the floor every day. We intend to continue that process and have budgeted accordingly.”

Obi is also trying to set itself apart from the low-price pack by cutting deals for premium parts. “Instead of going directly to the Chinese factories, we went to the key component vendors, because we know that ecosystem and have the relationships,” Sculley says. “We went to Sony. It’s struggling and losing money on its smartphone business, but they make the best camera modules in the world.”

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Former Rep. Louis Stokes, the Man Who Saved the Space Station, Dies At Age 90

MarkWhittington writes: The Associated Press noted the passing of former Rep. Louis Stokes at the age of 90. Since Stokes was an African American Democrat first elected in 1968, most of the accolades touch on his effect on the civil rights struggle and his lifelong fight against racism. However, as George Abbey, former NASA Director of the Johnson Spaceflight Center and current Fellow in Space Policy at the Baker Institute of Rice University pointed out on his Facebook Page, Stokes can be rightly be said to be the man who saved the International Space Station and perhaps human space flight in America.

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Former Employees Accuse Kaspersky Lab of Faking Malware

An anonymous reader writes: Reuters reports that two former employees of Moscow-based Kaspersky Lab faked malware to damage the reputations of their rivals. The alleged campaign targeted Microsoft, AVG, Avast, and others, tricking them into classifying harmless files as viruses. The ex-employees said co-founder Eugene Kaspersky ordered some of the attacks as retaliation for emulating his software. The company denied the allegations, and Kaspersky himself reiterated them, adding, “Such actions are unethical, dishonest and their legality is at least questionable.” The targeted companies had previously said somebody tried to induce false positives in their software, but they declined to comment on the new allegations. “In one technique, Kaspersky’s engineers would take an important piece of software commonly found in PCs and inject bad code into it so that the file looked like it was infected, the ex-employees said. They would send the doctored file anonymously to VirusTotal.” The alleged attacks went on for more than 10 years, peaking between 2009 and 2013.

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Confessions Of A Former Internet Troll

Because I was 16 and because I was angry, too readily bored and too easily lonely, and because I wanted very badly to be accepted by anyone at all, I once spent the better part of an October weekend doing nitrous oxide in a San Diego hotel suite with a dozen or so hackers and Internet trolls.
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