Vertu, Phone-Maker To the Rich, Says It’s Broke

A British-based luxury phone maker which made its name selling $ 50,000 smartphones decked out in alligator leather and titanium and fitted with sapphire screens, has applied to the courts to be placed in administration after running of out money to pay staff and suppliers, reports British outlet The Times. In a witness statement filed in the High Court in London yesterday, the report adds, the company’s last remaining director Jean-Charles Charki, said that Vertu was insolvent and unable to meet its June 30 payroll obligations of about 500,000 euros. From an earlier report: According to a juicy new report in the Telegraph, employees are worried about the future of the company after noticing that production had been running at reduced capacity. Employees are apparently worried about their unpaid wages, as well as pension contributions taken out of their paychecks without being added into the company’s retirement fund. Sources inside the company also told the Telegraph that Vertu has unpaid debts with suppliers such as Qualcomm and Microsoft, and bills from waste management, pest control, and other property services.

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Stay Curious: A Note From Joe Hanson Of ‘It’s Okay To Be Smart’

Celebrating curiosity and discovery is what Digg is all about too, which is why I feel right at home taking the reins for a day and giving the staff a little bonus time to finish their holiday shopping.
Digg Top Stories

It’s A Nasty And Wonderful World: A Note From This Weekend’s Guest Editor, Gideon Lichfield

The best things to come out of human tribalism are the stories, a few of which we’ll share here with you this weekend.
Digg Top Stories

Twitter Says It’s Beating the Trolls

Mark Wilson writes: After making it easier to report abusive tweets and increasing the size of its anti-troll team, Twitter believes it is getting ‘bad behavior’ under control. As well as bullying of acquaintances and work colleagues, Twitter has also been used to attack celebrities, the gay community, religious groups, and more, with many people feeling driven from the site. It seems that the decision to take a very hands-on approach to troll tackling is starting to pay off. The head of Twitter in Europe, Bruce Daisley, says that the tools that have been introduced have had a real impact on trolling. He goes further, saying that there is a direct correlation between the release of new safety tools and reporting mechanisms, and the drop in unacceptable behavior.

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Twitter Says It’s Beating the Trolls

Mark Wilson writes: After making it easier to report abusive tweets and increasing the size of its anti-troll team, Twitter believes it is getting ‘bad behavior’ under control. As well as bullying of acquaintances and work colleagues, Twitter has also been used to attack celebrities, the gay community, religious groups, and more, with many people feeling driven from the site. It seems that the decision to take a very hands-on approach to troll tackling is starting to pay off. The head of Twitter in Europe, Bruce Daisley, says that the tools that have been introduced have had a real impact on trolling. He goes further, saying that there is a direct correlation between the release of new safety tools and reporting mechanisms, and the drop in unacceptable behavior.

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ZFS Replication To the Cloud Is Finally Here and It’s Fast

New submitter kozubik writes: Jim Salter at arstechnica provides a detailed, technical rundown of ZFS send and receive and compares it to traditional remote syncing and backup tools such as rsync. He writes: ‘In mid-August, the first commercially available ZFS cloud replication target became available at rsync.net. Who cares, right? As the service itself states, If you’re not sure what this means, our product is Not For You. … after 15 years of daily use, I knew exactly what rsync’s weaknesses were, and I targeted them ruthlessly.’

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Abusing Symbolic Links Like It’s 1999

An anonymous reader writes with this snippet from James Forshaw’s recent post at Google’s Project Zero, which begins For the past couple of years I’ve been researching Windows elevation of privilege attacks. This might be escaping sandboxing or gaining system privileges. One of the techniques I’ve used multiple times is abusing the symbolic link facilities of the Windows operating system to redirect privileged code to create files or registry keys to escape the restrictive execution context. Symbolic links in themselves are not vulnerabilities, instead they’re useful primitives for exploiting different classes of vulnerabilities such as resource planting or time-of-check time-of-use. Click through that link to see examples of this abuse in action, but also information about how the underlying risks have been (or can be) mitigated.

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