Get Real, Microsoft: If the New Surface Pro Is a Laptop, Bundle It With a Type Cover

An anonymous reader shares an article: If Microsoft sold cars like it’s trying to sell its Surface Pro (2017), it would charge extra for wheels — and would be laughed out of the market. But Microsoft’s using this tactic to sell its new Windows tablet as a “laptop,” and we’re still trying to figure out why. Microsoft’s Surface Pro is clearly a Windows tablet, just like its predecessor, the Surface Pro 4. Nevertheless, devices chief Panos Panay calls it a “laptop” no fewer than three times in his blog post, including the very first sentence. No “laptop” or notebook PC forgoes a keyboard, however, as the Surface Pro does. Long-time Surface fans may know that Microsoft charges $ 129 to $ 159 more for that accessory, but does the average buyer get it? That’s where the confusion starts.

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‘New Way of Stealing Cars’: Hacking Them With A Laptop

retroworks writes: The Wall Street Journal (Warning: source may be paywalled), CBS and Marketwatch all lead the morning with stories about the newest method of stealing (late model) cars. No need for hacking off the ignition switch and touching the wires to create a spark (controversial during broadcasts in 1970s television crime criticized for “teaching people to steal cars”). Thieves now use the laptop to access the automobile’s computer system, and voila. “Police and car insurers say thieves are using laptop computers to hack into late-model cars’ electronic ignitions to steal the vehicles, raising alarms about the auto industry’s greater use of computer controls. The discovery follows a recent incident in Houston in which a pair of car thieves were caught on camera using a laptop to start a 2010 Jeep Wrangler and steal it from the owner’s driveway. Police say the same method may have been used in the theft of four other late-model Wranglers and Cherokees in the city. None of the vehicles have been recovered.” The article concludes with the example filmed of a break-in in Houston. The thief, says the NICB’s Mr. Morris, likely used the laptop to manipulate the car’s computer to recognize a signal sent from an electronic key the thief then used to turn on the ignition. The computer reads the signal and allows the key to turn. “We have no idea how many cars have been broken into using this method,” Mr. Morris said. “We think it is minuscule in the overall car thefts but it does show these hackers will do anything to stay one step ahead.” No details on modifying the program to run on Android or iPhone — there’s not yet “an app for that.”

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Could the Best Windows 10 Laptop Be a Mac?

dkatana writes: Now that Windows 10 is finally out there many people are looking for the best laptop with the power to make the new OS shine. The sweet spot appears to be in $ 900-$ 1500 machines from Dell, Asus and HP. But Apple, the company that has been fighting Windows for ever, has other options for Windows 10: the MacBook Pro and MacBook Air. According to InformationWeek there are many reasons to consider purchasing a MacBook as the next Windows machine, including design, reliability, performance, battery life, display quality and better keyboard. Also MacBooks have a higher resell value, retaining up to 50% of their price after five years.

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Privacy Alert: Your Laptop Or Phone Battery Could Track You Online

Mark Wilson writes: Is the battery in your smartphone being used to track your online activities? It might seem unlikely, but it’s not quite as farfetched as you might first think. This is not a case of malware or hacking, but a built-in component of the HTML5 specification. Originally designed to help reduce power consumption, the Battery Status API makes it possible for websites and apps to monitor the battery level of laptops, tablets, and phones. A paper published by a team of security researchers suggests that this represents a huge privacy risk. Using little more than the amount of power remaining in your battery, it is possible for people to be identified and tracked online. As reported by The Guardian, a paper entitled The Leaking Battery by Belgian and French privacy and security experts say that the API can be used in device fingerprinting.

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SlideN’Joy Extender Adds Up To Two More Screens For a Multi-Monitor Laptop

MojoKid writes: Nothing beats the portability of a notebook when it comes to getting work done while on-the-go, but with that portability comes a number of caveats like a smaller keyboard and being forced to use a touchpad if you don’t want to lug around a portable mouse. Then there’s also the limitation of a single display, for those who need more screen real estate for certain tasks. Enter Sliden’Joy, a Kickstarter project that’s set to launch on July 6. There’s not a lot of technical detail given about it so far, but the basics are easy to understand. Sliden’Joy effectively hooks onto your notebook to allow you to extend one or two screens out of either side, giving you an effective dual or triple monitor setup. Two models of Sliden’Joy are going to be produced, offering either 1 or 2 displays, and sizes of 13, 15, and 17-inch are all going to be supported. There’s no word on pledge levels quite yet, but the ultimate goal is to reach 300,000€ ($ ~332,000 USD) in 30 days.

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Recipes From The Islamic State's Laptop Of Doom

The black Dell laptop found in an Islamic State safe house inside Syria not only contains instructions for how to weaponize the bubonic plague, it also includes thousands of files that provide a window into how would-be jihadists become radicalized, and how they learn to carry out their deadly craft.
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