Gabby Giffords on San Bernardino school shooting: Events like this are no longer ‘unimaginable’

Gabby Giffords on San Bernardino school shooting: Events like this are no longer ‘unimaginable’The ex-congresswoman, who founded the gun control group Americans for Responsible Solutions after surviving a 2011 shooting, spoke after Monday’s school shooting.



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Javascript User Prohibitions Are Like Content DRM, But Even Less Effective

Robotech_Master writes: It always puzzles me whenever I run across a post somewhere that uses Javascript to try to prevent me from copying and pasting text, or even viewing the source. These measures are simple enough to bypass just by disabling Javascript in my browser. It seems like these measures are very similar to the DRM publishers insist on slapping onto e-books and movie discs—easy to defeat, but they just keep throwing them on anyway because they might inconvenience a few people.

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What an IT Career Will Look Like 5 Years Out

snydeq writes: InfoWorld’s Paul Heltzel reports on the impact that IT’s increasing reliance on the cloud for IT infrastructure will have on your career in the years ahead. “[O]ne fact is clear: Organizations of all stripes are increasingly moving IT infrastructure to the cloud. In fact, most IT pros who’ve pulled all-nighters, swapping in hard drives or upgrading systems while co-workers slept, probably won’t recognize their offices’ IT architecture — or the lack thereof — in five years. This shift will have a broad impact on IT’s role in the future — how departments are structured (or broken up), who sets the technical vision (or follows it), and which skills rise to prominence (or fall away almost entirely).”

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Chrome 45 Launches, Automatically Pauses Less Important Flash Content, Like Ads

An anonymous reader writes: Google today launched Chrome 45 for Windows, Mac, Linux, and Android with some expected changes and new developer tools. First and foremost, Chrome now automatically pauses less important Flash content (rolling out gradually, so be patient). This has been a longtime coming from both Google and Adobe, with the goal to make Flash content more power-efficient in Chrome: In March, a setting was introduced to play less Flash content on the page, but it wasn’t turned on by default, and in June, the option was enabled in the browser’s beta channel. Now it’s being turned on for everyone.

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Abusing Symbolic Links Like It’s 1999

An anonymous reader writes with this snippet from James Forshaw’s recent post at Google’s Project Zero, which begins For the past couple of years I’ve been researching Windows elevation of privilege attacks. This might be escaping sandboxing or gaining system privileges. One of the techniques I’ve used multiple times is abusing the symbolic link facilities of the Windows operating system to redirect privileged code to create files or registry keys to escape the restrictive execution context. Symbolic links in themselves are not vulnerabilities, instead they’re useful primitives for exploiting different classes of vulnerabilities such as resource planting or time-of-check time-of-use. Click through that link to see examples of this abuse in action, but also information about how the underlying risks have been (or can be) mitigated.

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Not All Uber Drivers Like Surge Pricing, Either

CNET reports that Uber’s practice of surge pricing, which sometimes raises the ire of passengers, isn’t universally acclaimed by the company’s drivers, either. “[M]ost Uber riders,” according the the linked article, “despise surge pricing,” though it’s not clear quite how that “most” is arrived at. From the piece: They’ve complained about running up bills totaling hundreds of dollars, and have criticized the company for using surge pricing during emergencies, like Hurricane Sandy and the Sydney hostage crisis. The San Francisco Better Business Bureau gave Uber the grade of an F because of complaints related to surge pricing. And New York lawmakers have even proposed legislation to put limits on how high fares can go. Now some drivers, like [San Francisco Uber driver Peter] Ashlock, are also having second thoughts on surge pricing.”

On the other hand, what system would you propose to better reward drivers for working at high-demand times?

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