When AI Botches Your Medical Diagnosis, Who’s To Blame?

Robert Hart has posed an interested question in his report on Quartz: When artificial intelligence botches your medical diagnosis, who’s to blame? Do you blame the AI, designer or organization? It’s just one of many questions popping up and starting to be seriously pondered by experts as artificial intelligence and automation continue to become more entwined into our daily lives. From the report: The prospect of being diagnosed by an AI might feel foreign and impersonal at first, but what if you were told that a robot physician was more likely to give you a correct diagnosis? Medical error is currently the third leading cause of death in the U.S., and as many as one in six patients in the British NHS receive incorrect diagnoses. With statistics like these, it’s unsurprising that researchers at Johns Hopkins University believe diagnostic errors to be “the next frontier for patient safety.” Of course, there are downsides. AI raises profound questions regarding medical responsibility. Usually when something goes wrong, it is a fairly straightforward matter to determine blame. A misdiagnosis, for instance, would likely be the responsibility of the presiding physician. A faulty machine or medical device that harms a patient would likely see the manufacturer or operator held to account. What would this mean for an AI?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Slashdot

Clinical Trials Begin For Russia’s First Medical Exoskeleton

pRobotika writes: Seven hundred people volunteered to try out the ExoAtlet when the Russian startup advertised its imminent clinical trials. Only a handful of these could be accommodated when testing of Russia’s first medical exoskeleton began recently in a Moscow hospital. It’s the latest step in the Skolkovo-backed innovation’s battle to reach the market, and progress is looking phenomenal. The video features the coolest looking exoskeleton testers we’ve seen in a long time.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Slashdot

IBM Drops $1 Billion On Medical Images For Watson

An anonymous reader writes: IBM is purchasing a company called Merge Healthcare for $ 1 billion. The company specializes in medical imaging software, and it will be a key new resource for IBM’s Watson AI. Big blue’s researchers estimate that 90% of all medical data is contained within images. Having a trove of them and the software to mine that data should help Watson learn how to make more accurate diagnoses. IBM thinks it’ll also provide better context for run-of-the-mill medical imaging. “[A] radiologist might examine thousands of patient images a day, but only looking for abnormalities on the images themselves rather than also taking into account a person’s medical history, treatments and drug regimens.” They can program Watson to do both. The AI is already landing contracts to assist with medical issues: “Last week, IBM announced a partnership with CVS Health, the large pharmacy chain, to develop data-driven services to help people with chronic ailments like diabetes and heart disease better manage their health.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Slashdot

DoD Ditches Open Source Medical Records System In $4.3B Contract

dmr001 writes: The US Department of Defense opted not to use the Department of Veterans Affairs’ open source VistA electronic health record system in its project to overhaul its legacy systems, instead opting for a consortium of Cerner, Leidos and Accenture. The initial $ 4.3 billion implementation is expected to be the first part of a $ 9 billion dollar project. The Under Secretary for Acquisition stated they wanted a system with minimum modifications and interoperability with private sector systems, though much of what passes for inter-vendor operability in the marketplace is more aspirational than operable. The DoD aims to start implementation at 8 sites in the Pacific Northwest by the end of 2016, noting that “legacy systems are eating us alive in terms of support and maintenance,” consuming 95% of the Military Health Systems IT budget.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Slashdot

The Story Of The Surprise $117,000 Medical Bill From An Unknown Doctor

In operating rooms and on hospital wards across the country, physicians and other health providers typically help one another in patient care. But in an increasingly common practice that some medical experts call drive-by doctoring, assistants, consultants and other hospital employees are charging patients or their insurers hefty fees.
Digg Top Stories