White House officials struggle to answer questions about Trump’s withdrawal from the Paris accord

White House officials struggle to answer questions about Trump’s withdrawal from the Paris accordPresident Donald Trump arrives to speak about the U.S. role in the Paris climate change accord, Thursday, June 1, 2017, in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington. WASHINGTON — Shortly after President Trump appeared in the Rose Garden on Thursday and announced his decision to pull the United States out of the Paris climate accord, a pair of White House officials spoke with reporters about the move.



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

Belgian police arrest six in bombing probe, French foil Paris plot

Masked Belgian police secure the entrance to a building in SchaerbeekBy Alastair Macdonald, Ingrid Melander and Foo Yun Chee BRUSSELS (Reuters) – Belgian police arrested six people in their probe of Tuesday's Islamic State suicide bombings in Brussels, while authorities in France said they thwarted a militant plot there "that was at an advanced stage." The federal prosecutor's office in Belgium said on Thursday that the arrests came during police searches in the Brussels neighborhoods of Schaerbeek in the north and Jette in the west, as well as in the center of the Belgian capital. The arrests came days after suicide bombers hit the Brussels airport and a metro train, killing at least 31 people and wounding some 270 in the worst such attack in Belgian history. The attack in Brussels, which is home to the European Union and NATO, has heightened security concerns around the world and raised questions about European countries' response to the threat from Islamist extremists.



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

The Science Behind the Paris Climate Accords

Lasrick writes: The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists offers a pretty thorough run-down of the pros and cons of the Paris climate accords. William Sweet examines not only the political machinations behind the agreement but much of what the agreement entails and how it got there after 21 years of COP meetings. “As for the tighter 1.5-degree standard, this is a complicated issue that the Paris accords fudge a bit. The difference between impacts expected from a 1.5-degree world and a 2-degree world are not trivial. The Greenland ice sheet, for example, is expected to melt in its entirely in the 2-degree scenario, while in a 1.5-degree world the odds of a complete melt are only 70 percent… But at the same time the scientific consensus is that it would be virtually impossible to meet the 1.5-degree goal because on top of the 0.8–0.9 degrees of warming that already has occurred, another half-degree is already in the pipeline, ‘hidden away in the oceans,’ as Schellnhuber put it.” In an additional audio recording of a teleconference briefing given to the Bulletin’s Science and Security Board and other leading scientists and policy makers, Sivan Kartha and Richard Somerville (both on the S & S Board) explain what was accomplished (and not accomplished).

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Slashdot

The Paris Climate Talks: Negotiating With the Atmosphere

Lasrick writes: The Paris climate change talks are in December, but what negotiators plan to propose will only be part of non-legally-binding pledges—and they represent only what is achievable without too much difficulty. 2009’s Copenhagen Accord say 114 countries agree that global temperature increases should be held below 2 degrees Celsius. “Paradoxically, an accord that should have spurred the world to immediate action instead seemed to offer some breathing room. Two degrees was meant to be a ceiling, but repeated references to an internationally agreed-upon “threshold” led many people to believe that nothing really bad could happen below 2 degrees—or worse yet, that the number itself was negotiable.” Dawn Stover writes about alternatives to the meaningless numbers and endless talks: ‘The very idea that the Paris conference is a negotiation is ridiculous. You can’t negotiate with the atmosphere.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Slashdot

A Model's Eye View Of Fashion Week In NYC And Paris

For models, Fashion Week starts the week before the shows, with castings all over the city. You show up, walk for designers and agents, and hope to get picked. Sometimes you don’t find out if you’ve been booked for a show until the day before. Two years ago, I started taking a camera with me to castings and shows to document what I was seeing.
Digg Top Stories