Apple Releases $300 Book Containing 450 Photos of Apple Products

Apple has a reputation for releasing “revolutionary” products that carry higher price tags than competing products. Today, the company hasn’t made that reputation any better as it has released a “$ 299 coffee table book” that contains 450 photographs of Apple products. The Verge reports: It’s a hardcover edition, bound in linen, and is available in two sizes: $ 199 for a smaller 10.20″ x 12.75″ version, and $ 299 for a larger 13″ x 16.25″ edition. The book is simply titled Designed by Apple in California — a name that somehow manages to be both humble and incredibly pretentious at the same time. The photos inside are all new images shot by Andrew Zuckerman, and will show off 20 years of Apple design “in a deliberately spare style.” In a press statement, chief designer Jony Ive described the book as “a gentle gathering of many of the products the team has designed over the years,” and hoped that it would serve as a “resource for students of all design disciplines.” The book is published by Apple itself, and is dedicated to the memory of Steve Jobs. It is, undeniably, an act of corporate vanity publishing on an impressive scale, but it’s one Apple deserves to get away with more than pretty much any other tech company. No one denies that when it comes to industrial design, Apple earns the praise it gets. That aside, though, the book’s publication does show a certain amount of self-interest, navel-gazing, and even arrogance from Apple — themes that were also present in September’s unveiling of the new MacBook Pros. It’s all very well to feel proud of the successes of the past, but we’ll be interested to see if the company can justify releasing another such book 20 years from now.

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Photos: Second night of protests in Charlotte

Photos: Second night of protests in CharlottePolice and protesters carry a seriously wounded protester into the parking area of the the Omni Hotel during a march to protest the death of Keith Scott September 21, 2016 in Carolina. Scott, who was black, was shot and killed at an apartment complex near UNC Charlotte by police officers, who say they warned Scott to drop a gun he was allegedly holding. (Brian Blanco/Getty Images)

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Apple Patenting a Way To Collect Fingerprints, Photos of Thieves

An anonymous reader quotes a report from Apple Insider: As published by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, Apple’s invention covering “Biometric capture for unauthorized user identification” details the simple but brilliant — and legally fuzzy — idea of using an iPhone or iPad’s Touch ID module, camera and other sensors to capture and store information about a potential thief. Apple’s patent is also governed by device triggers, though different constraints might be applied to unauthorized user data aggregation. For example, in one embodiment a single failed authentication triggers the immediate capture of fingerprint data and a picture of the user. In other cases, the device might be configured to evaluate the factors that ultimately trigger biometric capture based on a set of defaults defined by internal security protocols or the user. Interestingly, the patent application mentions machine learning as a potential solution for deciding when to capture biometric data and how to manage it. Other data can augment the biometric information, for example time stamps, device location, speed, air pressure, audio data and more, all collected and logged as background operations. The deemed unauthorized user’s data is then either stored locally on the device or sent to a remote server for further evaluation.

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Fascinating Photos From The Secret Trash Museum In A New York Sanitation Garage

On the second floor of a nondescript warehouse owned by New York City’s Sanitation Department in East Harlem is a treasure trove — filled with other people’s trash.
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Germany Says Taking Photos Of Food Infringes The Chef’s Copyright

xPertCodert writes: According this article in Der Welt (Google translate from German), in Germany if you take a picture of a dish in a restaurant without prior permission, you are violating chef’s copyright for his creation and can be liable to pay a hefty fine. If this approach to foodporn will become universal, what will we put in our Instagrams? Techdirt reports: “Apparently, this situation goes back to a German court judgment from 2013, which widened copyright law to include the applied arts too. As a result, the threshold for copyrightability was lowered considerably, with the practical consequence that it was easier for chefs to sue those who posted photographs of their creations without permission. The Die Welt article notes that this ban can apply even to manifestly unartistic piles of food dumped unceremoniously on a plate if a restaurant owner puts up a notice refusing permission for photos to be taken of its food.”

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