Pres. Trump to Congress: ‘I Acted' in Interest’ of U.S. in Syria, While Admin. Aides Battle for Position

Pres. Trump to Congress: ‘I Acted' in Interest’ of U.S. in Syria, While Admin. Aides Battle for PositionIn a letter to Congress, Trump defended his authorization of military strikes on a Syrian airfield this week, saying it was well within his legal right to do so. Meanwhile, some of his top aides reportedly held a Friday meeting to clear the air.



Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines

Ask Slashdot: Advice On Enterprise Architect Position

dave562 writes: I could use some advice from the community. I have almost 20 years of IT experience, 5 of it with the company I am currently working for. In my current position, the infrastructure and applications that I am responsible for account for nearly 80% of the entire IT infrastructure of the company. In broad strokes our footprint is roughly 60 physical hosts that run close to 1500 VMs and a SAN that hosts almost 4PB of data. The organization is a moderate sized (~3000 employees), publicly traded company with a nearly $ 1 billion market value (recent fluctuations not withstanding). I have been involved in a constant struggle with the core IT group over how to best run the operations. They are a traditional, internal facing IT shop. They have stumbled through a private cloud initiative that is only about 30% realized. I have had to drag them kicking and screaming into the world of automated provisioning, IaaS, application performance monitoring, and all of the other IT “must haves” that a reasonable person would expect from a company of our size. All the while, I have never had full access to the infrastructure. I do not have access to the storage. I do not have access to the virtualization layer. I do not have Domain Admin rights. I cannot see the network. The entire organization has been ham strung by an “enterprise architect” who relies on consultants to get the job done, but does not have the capability to properly scope the projects. This has resulted in failure after failure and a broken trail of partially implemented projects. (VMware without SRM enabled. EMC storage hardware without automated tiering enabled. Numerous proof of concept systems that never make it into production because they were not scoped properly.) After 5 years of succeeding in the face of all of these challenges, the organization has offered me the Enterprise Architect position. However they do not think that the position should have full access to the environment. It is an “architecture” position and not a “sysadmin” position is how they explained it to me. That seems insane. It is like asking someone to draw a map, without being able to actually visit the place that needs to be mapped. For those of you in the community who have similar positions, what is your experience? Do you have unfettered access to the environment? Are purely architectural / advisory roles the norm at this level?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Slashdot