Take-Two Acquires Kerbal Space Program

Eloking quotes a report from Polygon: Take-Two Interactive has purchased physics-based space simulation Kerbal Space Program, according to announcements from publisher Take-Two and developer Squad. “We have been impressed with Kerbal Space Program since its launch, and we are committed to grow this unique experience while continuing to support its passionate community,” said Michael Worosz, senior vice president, head of corporate development and independent publishing at Take-Two, in a release. “We view Kerbal Space Program as a new, long-term franchise that adds a well-respected and beloved IP to Take-Two’s portfolio as we continue to explore opportunities across the independent development landscape.” Kerbal Space Program officially launched on PC in 2015. The game had been available through Steam’s Early Access program since 2013. It has since gone on to sell more than 2 million copies on console and PC. Developer Squad said in a statement that the acquisition won’t alter its plan for continued development of Kerbal Space Program. The developer is currently working on the Making History Expansion for the game.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Slashdot

Justice Department Shuts Down Huge Asset Forfeiture Program

HughPickens.com writes: Christopher Ingraham reports at the Washington Post that the Department of Justice has announced that it’s suspending a controversial asset forfeiture program that allows local police departments to keep a large portion of assets seized from citizens under federal law and funnel it into their own coffers. Asset forfeiture has become an increasingly contentious practice in recent years. It lets police seize and keep cash and property from people who are never convicted — and in many cases, never charged with wrongdoing. Recent reports have found that the use of the practice has exploded in recent years, prompting concern that, in some cases, police are motivated more by profits and less by justice. Criminal justice reformers are cheering the change. “This is a significant deal,” says Lee McGrath, legislative counsel at the Institute for Justice. “Local law enforcement responds to incentives. And it’s clear that one of the biggest incentives is the relative payout from federal versus state forfeiture. And this announcement by the DOJ changes the playing field for which law state and local [law enforcement] is going to prefer.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Slashdot

Why Apple’s iPhone Upgrade Program Is a Bad Deal For Most

Mark Wilson writes: You may have heard that Apple had a little get together today. There were lots of big launches — the iPhone 6S, the iPhone 6S Plus, and the iPad Pro. Those waiting for an iPhone fix were given quite a lot of get excited about, but like your friendly local drug dealer, Apple has a ‘sweetener’ to help ensure its customers just keep on coming back for more: the iPhone Upgrade Program which lets you upgrade to a new iPhone every year as long as you keep paying each month. On the face of it, it might seem like a good deal — particularly as the price includes Apple Care — but is that really the case? What Apple’s actually doing is feeding the habit of iPhone junkies, keeping their addiction going a little bit longer, and a little bit longer, and a little bit longer. In reality, Apple would like you to perma-rent your iPhone and keep paying through the nose for it. Ideally forever.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Slashdot

Kenya’s iHub Creates Accelerator Program For Tech-Hardware Entrepreneurs

An anonymous reader writes: The iHub in Nairobi has long been at the epicentre of tech developments in Africa, and has been lauded by both Barack Obama and Satya Nadella in recent weeks. It currently has about 3000 software devs registered as members, but since last year has been building a makerspace for hardware entrepreneurs, too. Gearbox, as its called, it’s just launched its first incubation program with the backing of Village Capital, offering $ 100,000 in investment opportunities for 12 entrepreneurs through a three month program. According to the organisers, it’s the first of its kind on the continent.
(It’s certainly not the first hackerspace in Africa, though — even in 2012, there were quite a few.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Slashdot

Apple Launches Free iPhone 6 Plus Camera Replacement Program

Mark Wilson writes: Complaints about the camera of the iPhone 6 Plus have been plentiful, and Apple has finally acknowledged that there is a problem. It’s not something that affects all iPhone 6 Plus owners, but the company says that phones manufactured between September 2014 and January 2015 could include a failed camera component. Apple has set up a replacement program which enables those with problems with the rear camera to obtain a replacement. Before you get too excited, it is just replacement camera components that are on offer, not replacement iPhones. You’ll need to check to see if your phone is eligible at the program website. (Also at TechCrunch.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Slashdot

Antineutrino Detectors Could Be Key To Monitoring Iran’s Nuclear Program

agent elevator writes: Tech that analyzes antineutrinos might be the best way to keep tabs on Iran’s nuclear program. The technology, which can tell how much of and what kind of plutonium and uranium are nearby, should be ready to serve as a nuclear safeguard in less than two years, according to IEEE Spectrum. In a simulation of the Arak nuclear plant, which the Iran deal requires be redesigned to make less plutonium, a detector parked outside in a shipping container could do the job.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Slashdot

Computer Program Fixes Old Code Faster Than Expert Engineers

An anonymous reader writes: Less than two weeks after one group of MIT researchers unveiled a system capable of repairing software bugs automatically, a different group has demonstrated another system called Helium, which “revamps and fine-tunes code without ever needing the original source, in a matter of hours or even minutes.” The process works like this: “The team started with a simple building block of programming that’s nevertheless extremely difficult to analyze: binary code that has been stripped of debug symbols, which represents the only piece of code that is available for proprietary software such as Photoshop. … With Helium, the researchers are able to lift these kernels from a stripped binary and restructure them as high-level representations that are readable in Halide, a CSAIL-designed programming language geared towards image-processing. … From there, the Helium system then replaces the original bit-rotted components with the re-optimized ones. The net result: Helium can improve the performance of certain Photoshop filters by 75 percent, and the performance of less optimized programs such as Microsoft Windows’ IrfanView by 400 to 500 percent.” Their full academic paper (PDF) is available online.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Slashdot

Analysis: Iran’s Nuclear Program Has Been an Astronomical Waste

Lasrick writes: Business Insider’s Armin Rosen uses a fuel-cost calculator from the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists to show that Iran’s nuclear program has been “astronomically costly” for the country. Rosen uses calculations from this tool to hypothesize that what Iran “interprets as the country’s ‘rights’ under the 1970 Non-Proliferation Treaty is a diplomatic victory that justifies the outrageous expense of the nuclear program.” Great data crunching.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Slashdot