The Right To Repair Movement Is Forcing Apple To Change

The executive director of Repair.org says Apple has “decided to be nicer to consumers in order to stop them from demanding their right to repair,” according to Motherboard. Slashdot reader Jason Koebler shared this article:

It’s increasingly looking like Apple can no longer ignore the repair insurgency that’s been brewing: The right to repair movement is winning, and Apple’s behavior is changing. In the last few months, Apple has made political, design, and customer service decisions that suggest the right to repair movement is having a real impact on the company’s operations…

Apple has repeatedly made small concessions to its customers on the issues that Repair.org and the larger repair community have decided to highlight. The question is whether these concessions are going to be enough to satiate customers who want their devices to be easily repairable and upgradable, and whether the right to repair movement can convince those people to continue demanding fair treatment.
The article notes that at least 12 U.S. states are still considering “fair repair” laws, which would force Apple to sell replacement parts to both independent repair shops and the general public.

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WSJ: We Need the Right To Repair Our Gadgets

An anonymous reader writes: An editorial in the Wall Street Journal rings a bell we’ve been ringing for years: “Who owns the knowledge required to take apart and repair TVs, phones and other electronics? Manufacturers stop us by controlling repair plans and limiting access to parts. Some even employ digital software locks to keep us from making changes or repairs. This may not always be planned obsolescence, but it’s certainly intentional obfuscation.” The article shows that awareness of this consumer-hostile behavior (and frustration with it) is going mainstream. The author links to several DIY repair sites like iFixit, and concludes, “Repairing stuff isn’t as complicated as they want you to think. Skilled gadget owners and independent repair pros deserve access to the information they need to do the best job they can.”

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