The Right To Repair Movement Is Forcing Apple To Change

The executive director of Repair.org says Apple has “decided to be nicer to consumers in order to stop them from demanding their right to repair,” according to Motherboard. Slashdot reader Jason Koebler shared this article:

It’s increasingly looking like Apple can no longer ignore the repair insurgency that’s been brewing: The right to repair movement is winning, and Apple’s behavior is changing. In the last few months, Apple has made political, design, and customer service decisions that suggest the right to repair movement is having a real impact on the company’s operations…

Apple has repeatedly made small concessions to its customers on the issues that Repair.org and the larger repair community have decided to highlight. The question is whether these concessions are going to be enough to satiate customers who want their devices to be easily repairable and upgradable, and whether the right to repair movement can convince those people to continue demanding fair treatment.
The article notes that at least 12 U.S. states are still considering “fair repair” laws, which would force Apple to sell replacement parts to both independent repair shops and the general public.

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Google Appeals French Order For Global ‘Right To Be Forgotten’

An anonymous reader quotes a report from Reuters: Alphabet Inc’s Google appealed on Thursday an order from the French data protection authority to remove certain web search results globally in response to a European privacy ruling, escalating a fight on the extra-territorial reach of EU law. In May 2014, the European Court of Justice (ECJ) ruled that people could ask search engines, such as Google and Microsoft’s Bing, to remove inadequate or irrelevant information from web results appearing under searches for people’s names — dubbed the “right to be forgotten.” Google complied, but it only scrubbed results across its European websites such as Google.de in Germany and Google.fr in France, arguing that to do otherwise would set a dangerous precedent on the territorial reach of national laws. The French regulator, the Commission Nationale de l’Informatique et des Libertes (CNIL), fined Google 100,000 euros ($ 112,150.00) in March for not delisting more widely, arguing that was the only way to uphold Europeans’ right to privacy. The company filed its appeal of the CNIL’s order with France’s supreme administrative court, the Council of State. “One nation does not make laws for another,” said Dave Price, senior product counsel, Google. “Data protection law, in France and around Europe, is explicitly territorial, that is limited to the territory of the country whose law is being applied.” Google’s Transparency Report indicates the company accepts around 40 percent of requests for the removal of links appearing under search results for people’s names.

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Will Bernie Sanders do the right thing? And what is that, anyway?

Will Bernie Sanders do the right thing? And what is that, anyway?Hillary Clinton lost last week’s West Virginia primary by nearly 16 points. Sanders is in a hole — the kind of hole from which people cannot be rescued. The question now is, What kind of a loser will Bernie Sanders be?



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Did Google and the Hour of Code Get “Left” and “Right” Wrong?

theodp writes: Command the dancers to “point left” in Google’s dance-themed Code Boogie learn-to-code tutorial on the Santa Tracker website, and the dancers actually point to their own right. The lesson seems to reinforce a common mistake made by younger children learning to code in LOGO, which is to use their own or the display screen’s frame of reference rather than the turtle’s frame of reference. “These misconceptions,” explained Richard E. Mayer, “may be due to the knowledge that the child brings with him or her to the programming environment. For example, children who possess an egocentric conception of space (Piaget & Inhelder, 1956) would fail to recognize that when the turtle is at a 180-degree orientation, its right corresponds to the child’s left.” So, it should probably be asked if the learn-to-code tutorials from Lucasfilm, Code.org, and Google that are being used to teach the world’s K-12 schoolchildren to code might be making the same mistake as 4-7 year-olds. In this year’s flagship flagship Lucasfilm/Code.org Star Wars Hour of Code tutorial, for example, command the droid BB-8 to move left and it could move to either its own left or right depending on what direction it’s pointed in. So, did the “Largest Learning Event in History” also get “left” and “right” wrong?

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WSJ: We Need the Right To Repair Our Gadgets

An anonymous reader writes: An editorial in the Wall Street Journal rings a bell we’ve been ringing for years: “Who owns the knowledge required to take apart and repair TVs, phones and other electronics? Manufacturers stop us by controlling repair plans and limiting access to parts. Some even employ digital software locks to keep us from making changes or repairs. This may not always be planned obsolescence, but it’s certainly intentional obfuscation.” The article shows that awareness of this consumer-hostile behavior (and frustration with it) is going mainstream. The author links to several DIY repair sites like iFixit, and concludes, “Repairing stuff isn’t as complicated as they want you to think. Skilled gadget owners and independent repair pros deserve access to the information they need to do the best job they can.”

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Shape-Shifting Navigation Device Points You In the Right Direction

Zothecula writes: Developed by Yale engineer Adam Spiers, the Animotus is a wirelessly-connected, 3D printed cube that changes shape to help direct you like a haptic compass. Gizmag reports: ” Spiers designed Animotus when he was involved in a performance of Flatland, an interactive play based on Edwin A. Abbott’s 1884 story of a two-dimensional world. As part of the stage production, audience members – both sighted and visually impaired – were kept in complete darkness and walked four at a time though the performance space with narrative voice overs and sound effects telling the story as they wandered through. In their hands, each participant held an Animotus that guided them by changing shape to point them in the right direction. With a multi-sectioned body created in a 3D printer, that Animotus alters shape in response to wireless instructions to indicate the user’s position in their environment. To do this, the top half of the cube twists around to point users toward their next destination and then slides forward to give a relative indication of the distance to get there. As a result, rather than having to look at a device, such as the screen of a smartphone, the user was able to determine their path by touch.”

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Slashdot

Ask Slashdot: Do You Press “6” Key With Right Or Left Hand?

New submitter ne0phyte73 writes: In some countries and in some touch typing books key “6” is pressed with right hand and in some others with left. It’s not a big issue until you have a split keyboard. Guys at UHK are putting it on the left side. Do you agree? What hand do you use to press “6”? Left hand here, but it’s not a strong preference; I’ll take a keyboard that omits Caps Lock wherever they put the 6.

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Now Google Must Censor Search Results About “Right To Be Forgotten” Removals

Mark Wilson writes, drolly, that the so-called right to be forgotten “has proved somewhat controversial,” and expands on that with a new twist in a post at Beta News:

While some see the requirement for Google to remove search results that link to pages that contain information about people that is ‘inadequate, irrelevant or no longer relevant’ as a win for privacy, other see it as a form of censorship. To fight back, there have been a number of sites that have started to list the stories Google is forced to stop linking to. In the latest twist, Google has now been ordered to remove links to contemporary news reports about the stories that were previously removed from search results. All clear? Thought not… The Information Commissioner’s Office has ordered Google to remove from search results links to nine stories about other search result links removed under the Right to Be Forgotten rules.

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Google Accidentally Reveals Data On ‘Right To Be Forgotten’ Requests

Colin Castro points out an article from The Guardian, who noticed that Google’s recent transparency report contained more data than intended. When perusing the source code, they found data about who was making requests for Google to take down links under the “right to be forgotten” law. The data they found covers 75% of all requests made so far.
Less than 5% of nearly 220,000 individual requests made to Google to selectively remove links to online information concern criminals, politicians and high-profile public figures, the Guardian has learned, with more than 95% of requests coming from everyday members of the public. … Of 218,320 requests to remove links between 29 May 2014 and 23 March 2015, 101,461 (46%) have been successfully delisted on individual name searches. Of these, 99,569 involve “private or personal information.”
Only 1,892 requests – less than 1% of the overall total – were successful for the four remaining issue types identified within Google’s source code: “serious crime” (728 requests), “public figure” (454), “political” (534) or “child protection” (176) – presumably because they concern victims, incidental witnesses, spent convictions, or the private lives of public persons.

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