The Story of Oculus Rift

An anonymous reader writes: A lengthy new article details the history of the Oculus Rift, from the VR headset’s stereotypical beginnings in a hacker’s parents’ garage to its $ 2 billion acquisition by Facebook. “Luckey got into VR by way of computer games, which he was obsessed with for a time. After building what he recalls as a “beautiful six-monitor setup,” for extreme visual saturation, he wondered, Why not just put a small screen directly on your face?” At just 19 years old, Luckey built a prototype good enough to impress John Carmack, which brought him all sorts of further attention. Investors came running, and eventually Mark Zuckerberg took an interest. “When Zuckerberg arrived, Luckey introduced himself and then quickly walked away. ‘I’m a big fan,’ he said, ‘but I actually have to get back to work.’ … Zuckerberg seemed taken aback by Luckey’s brusqueness but also charmed. ‘They definitely have the hacker culture that we have,’ he says.” As the device approaches release, they’re all wondering how much VR will change the world.

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A Life Story In Tattoos, And How They Liberated Me

As a child, people with tattoos were badasses and rebels — I imagined they sat in somebody’s basement, fearless, silent and maybe smoking a cigarette while someone bled them slowly in the name of body art. I wanted to feel that strength. I was petite and black and a girl and tired of being teased and abused. I wanted to flex.
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The LibreOffice Story

An anonymous reader writes: Jono Bacon in his latest column writes about the story of LibreOffice and how it rose out of the ashes of StarOffice and OpenOffice.org. Bacon also touches on why he feels LibreOffice is such a key piece of Open Source for communities across the world. Jono says: “To look at LibreOffice today and compare it to Microsoft Office can be tempting. Sure, LibreOffice does not provide the same level of features and finesse Microsoft’s suite may boast, but when I think of the before and after vanity shots of the suite back in 1999 and today, what the community has accomplished is phenomenal. Developing LibreOffice has been hard, technically challenging, and at times demotivating work, and contributors’ efforts can be seen by millions of users across the world.”

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