Trump suggests Republicans should ‘protect their president’

Trump suggests Republicans should ‘protect their president’The president tweeted on Sunday that it is “very sad” Republicans are doing "very little to protect" him — and admitted that the ongoing Russia probe, while “phony,” may be “taking hold.”



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Asked about the ‘deep state,’ White House says Obama allies ‘burrowed into government’ to enact their own agenda

Asked about the ‘deep state,’ White House says Obama allies ‘burrowed into government’ to enact their own agendaWhite House press secretary Sean Spicer said Friday that there’s “no question” there are allies of former President Barack Obama who are “burrowed into government” and working to push a liberal “agenda.” Spicer’s comments came after Yahoo News asked if the White House believes there’s a “deep state” that is actively working to undermine President Trump. “Well, I think that there’s no question when you have eight years of one party in office that there are people who stay in government … and continue to espouse the agenda of the previous administration,” Spicer said.



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How Security Experts Are Protecting Their Own Data

Today the San Jose Mercury News asked several prominent security experts which security products they were actually using for their own data. An anonymous Slashdot reader writes:
The EFF’s chief technologist revealed that he doesn’t run an anti-virus program, partly because he’s using Linux, and partly because he feels anti-virus software creates a false sense of security. (“I don’t like to get complacent and rely on it in any way…”) He does regularly encrypt his e-mail, “but he doesn’t recommend that average users scramble their email, because he thinks the encryption software is just too difficult to use.”

The newspaper also interviewed security expert Eugene Spafford, who rarely updates the operating system on one of his computers — because it’s not connected to the internet — and sometimes even accesses his files with a virtual machine, which he then deletes when he’s done. His home router is equipped with a firewall device, and “he’s developed some tools in his research center that he uses to try to detect security problems,” according to the article. “There are some additional things I do,” Spafford added, telling the reporter that “I’m not going to give details of all of them, because that doesn’t help me.”

Bruce Schneier had a similar answer. When the reporter asked how he protected his data, Schneier wouldn’t tell them, adding “I’m kind of a target…”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Slashdot

Why Americans Renounce Their Citizenship

Daniel Kuettel considered himself both as American as apple pie and as Swiss as an army knife. His distant relatives on his mother’s side had come to America on the Mayflower, and Kuettel had spent three years in active service for the US Army. So why would he renounce his citizenship?
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Amazon Makes It Almost Impossible To Calculate Their “Virtual CPU” Equivalent

dkatana writes: AWS started out defining its virtual CPUs as being composed of EC2 compute units, or ECUs, which it defined as an equivalent to a physical Xeon processor. However, a virtual CPU now looks suspiciously variable… A virtual CPU is whatever Amazon wants to offer in an instance series. The user has no firm measure to go by. From the article:

[B]y doing a little math, you could actually compare what you were getting in virtual CPUs in EC2 versus Azure. Also by doing a little math, you knew how to compare one Amazon instance to another based on the ECU count in each virtual CPU. Microsoft didn’t look too bad in the comparison.

That is one of the casualties of the nomenclature change.

I have searched for updated information on how a virtual CPU is measured and found nothing comparable to the definition of the 2012 ECU measure. I have questioned Amazon representatives three times between Oct. 27 and Dec. 21, and don’t have much of an answer.”

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PhantomSquad Hackers Begin Their Xmas DDoS Attacks By Taking Down EA Servers

An anonymous reader writes: The hacking crew was not kidding about their Christmas DDoS attacks on Xbox & PSN. This morning the group started warmup attacks on the EA network, taking it down for 3 hours. The attacks were severe enough to take down the network completely, and EA issued apologies on its Twitter account. Phantom Squad is now carrying out DDoS attacks on PSN. Users started reporting outages in small areas around the world.

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Cisco Systems Will Be Auditing Their Code For Backdoors

An anonymous reader writes: In the wake of the discovery of two backdoors on Juniper’s NetScreen firewall devices, Cisco Systems has announced that they will be reviewing the software running on their devices, just in case. Anthony Grieco, a Senior Director of the Security and Trust Organization at Cisco, made sure to first point out that the popular networking equipment manufacturer has a “no backdoor” policy.

According to Anthony Grieco, a Senior Director at Cisco’s Security and Trust Organization, “Although our normal practices should detect unauthorized software, we recognize that no process can eliminate all risk. Our additional review includes penetration testing and code reviews by engineers with deep networking and cryptography experience.” The reviewers will be looking for backdoors, hardcoded or undocumented account credentials, covert communication channels and undocumented traffic diversions.

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Why Do So Many Tech Workers Dislike Their Jobs?

Nerval’s Lobster writes: So what if you work for a tech company that offers free lunch, in-house gym, and dry cleaning? A new survey suggests that a majority of software engineers, developers, and sysadmins are miserable. Granted, the survey in question only involved 5,000 respondents, so it shouldn’t be viewed as comprehensive (it was also conducted by a company that deals in employee engagement), but it’s nonetheless insightful into the reasons why a lot of tech pros apparently dislike their jobs. Apparently perks don’t matter quite so much if your employees have no sense of mission, don’t have a clear sense of how they can get promoted, and don’t interact with their co-workers very well. While that should be glaringly obvious, a lot of companies are still fixated on the idea that minor perks will apparently translate into huge morale boosts; but free smoothies in the cafeteria only goes so far.

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Most Healthcare Managers Admit Their IT Systems Have Been Compromised

Lucas123 writes: Eighty-one percent of healthcare IT managers say their organizations have been compromised by at least one malware, botnet or other kind of cyber attack during the past two years, and only half of those managers feel that they are adequately prepared to prevent future attacks, according to a new survey by KPMG. The KPMG survey polled 223 CIOs, CTOs, chief security officers and chief compliance officers at healthcare providers and health plans, and found 65% indicated malware was most frequently reported line of attack during the past 12 to 24 months. Additionally, those surveyed indicated the areas with the greatest vulnerabilities within their organization include external attackers (65%), sharing data with third parties (48%), employee breaches (35%), wireless computing (35%) and inadequate firewalls (27%). Top among reasons healthcare facilities are facing increased risk, was the adoption of digital patient records and the automation of clinical systems.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


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