Oklahoma Video Vigilante Uses Drone To Wage War Against Prostitutes and Johns

HughPickens.com writes: Chris Baraniuk writes at BBC that Brian Bates, known in Oklahoma as the “Video Vigilante,” is taking credit for Amanda Zolicoffer’s conviction on a lewdness charge after being caught on Bates’ drone mounted camera in a sex act in a parked vehicle last year. Zolicoffer was sentenced to a year in state prison for the misdemeanor while the case against her alleged client, who was released following arrest in December, is still pending. “I’m sort of known in the Oklahoma City area,” says Bates . “For the last 20 years I’ve used a video camera to document street-level and forced prostitution, and human trafficking.” Bates runs a website where he publishes videos of alleged sex workers and their clients. “I am openly referred to as a video vigilante, I don’t really shy away from that,” says Bates adding that the two individuals were inside a vehicle and the incident occurred away from other members of the public. The drone dropped to within a few feet of the vehicle where it filmed a 75 year old in the front seat of the white pickup truck. The duo separated after Zolicoffer, who was identified by her tattoo saying “Baby Gangster,” saw the drone hovering overhead.

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‘Snowboarding with the NYPD’: YouTube filmmakers use NYC blizzard shutdown for viral video

A pair of enterprising if law-bending filmmakers used the weekend blizzard that shut down New York City to produce a soon-to-be-viral video showing them skiing and snowboarding through Manhattan's near-empty streets — and right through Times Square.



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Star Wars Fans and Video Game Geeks ‘More Likely To Be Narcissists,’ Study Finds

schwit1 writes: Those who take part in “geeky events” are more likely to have an “elevated grandiose” level of narcissism, according to a study conducted by the University of Georgia. Psychologists examined the personality traits of those who turn to “geek culture,” developing a Geek Culture Engagement Scale and a Geek Identity Scale to help quantify the figures. It was found that those who scored highly on both scales were more likely to narcissists. Subjects are scored on a scale of one to five, depending on how often they take part in activities such as live action role playing games, Dungeons and Dragons, cosplaying, puppetry, robotics — and enjoying things such as video games and Star Wars.

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Brady Forrest Talks About Building a Hardware Startup (Video)

Brady Forrest is co-author of The Hardware Startup: Building Your Product, Business, and Brand. He has extensive experience building both products and startups, including staffing, financing, and marketing. If you are thinking or dreaming about doing a startup, you should not only watch the video to “meet” Brady, but read the transcript for more info than the video covers.

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Mozilla Project Working on Immersive Displays (Video)

Yes, it’s 3-D, and works with the Firefox browser. But that’s not all. The MozVR virtual reality system is not just for Firefox, and it can incorporate infrared and other sensors to give a more complete picture than can be derived from visible light alone. In theory, the user’s (client) computer needs no special hardware beyond a decent GPU and an Oculus Rift headset. Everything else lives on a server.

Is this the future of consumer displays? Even if not, the development is fun to watch, which you can start doing at mozvr.com — and if you’re serious about learning about this project you may want to read our interview transcript in addition to watching the video, because the transcript contains additional information.

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The IoT, the MinnowBoard, and How They Fit Into the Universe (Video

The IoT is becoming more pervasive partly because processor costs are dropping. So are bandwidth costs, even if your ISP isn’t sharing those savings with you. Today’s interviewee, Mark Skarpness, is “the Director of Embedded Software in the Open Source Technology Center at Intel Corporation,” which is an amazing mouthful of a title. What it means is that he works to extend Intel’s reach into Open Source communities, and is also aware of how hardware and software price drops — and bandwidth price drops at the “wholesale” level — mean that if you add a dash of IPV6, even lowly flip-flops might have their own IPs one day.

This video interview is a little less than six minutes long, while the text transcript covers a 17 minute conversation between Mark Skarpness and Slashdot’s Timothy Lord. The video can be considered a “meet Mark” thing, and watching it will surely give you the idea that yes, this guy knows his stuff, but for more info about the spread of the IoT and how the Open Hardware MinnowBoard fits into the panoply of developer tools for IoT work, you’ll have to read the transcript.

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The Most Satisfying 5 Minutes Of Video Game Driving You Will Ever Watch

Imagine hitting 18 holes-in-one in a row in mini golf. Imagine playing skee-ball and nailing 100 point shots each time. This car driving is just like that, only smoother and more graceful and perfect.
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HooperFly is an Open Source, Modular Drone (Video)

Tricopters, quadcopters, hexicopters. A HooperFly can be any of these, or an octocopter or possibly even a larger number than that. The HooperFly is a modular creation, and spokesman Rich Burton says the design is open source (and was showing off the HooperFly at OSCON), so the flier’s configuration is limited only by your imagination. The main construction material is plastic tubing available from most building supply and hardware stores. The electronics? We didn’t see schematics or code, but presumably they’re out there. One thing for sure is that the HooperFly is good for making music videos like M.I.A. & The Partysquad’s Double Bubble Trouble (NSFP; i.e. NotSafeForPrudes; has images of 3-D printed guns, flying copters, etc.) and the lyrical Peace Drone at Twilight. It looks like HooperFly lives at the intersection of technology and art, which is a good place to be — not that there aren’t plenty of HooperFly skateboard videos, too, because one of the first things it seems most skateboarders do when they get a camera-equipped drone is shoot a skateboard video and post it to YouTube. But beyond that, intrepid drone pilots can work with the HooperFly’s autopilot features to do many beautiful (and hopefully legal) things.

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