When AI Botches Your Medical Diagnosis, Who’s To Blame?

Robert Hart has posed an interested question in his report on Quartz: When artificial intelligence botches your medical diagnosis, who’s to blame? Do you blame the AI, designer or organization? It’s just one of many questions popping up and starting to be seriously pondered by experts as artificial intelligence and automation continue to become more entwined into our daily lives. From the report: The prospect of being diagnosed by an AI might feel foreign and impersonal at first, but what if you were told that a robot physician was more likely to give you a correct diagnosis? Medical error is currently the third leading cause of death in the U.S., and as many as one in six patients in the British NHS receive incorrect diagnoses. With statistics like these, it’s unsurprising that researchers at Johns Hopkins University believe diagnostic errors to be “the next frontier for patient safety.” Of course, there are downsides. AI raises profound questions regarding medical responsibility. Usually when something goes wrong, it is a fairly straightforward matter to determine blame. A misdiagnosis, for instance, would likely be the responsibility of the presiding physician. A faulty machine or medical device that harms a patient would likely see the manufacturer or operator held to account. What would this mean for an AI?

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The Man Who’s Kept His Face Off the Internet for 20 Years

An anonymous reader writes: Jonathan Hirshon is a 48-year-old Silicon Valley PR guy. He was an adult when the internet went mainstream, and he went online with a unique bit of forethought: “I decided to play a game with myself: How long could I keep my picture off the Internet.” He’s managed to keep the internet free of his image for two decades, and he’s expanding the game. Hirshon is rallying the troops to outsmart Facebook and Google facial recognition. He asked his friends, “If you’re so inclined, take a moment and tag me in some random picture or image. A leaf on the wind, a howler monkey, geometry equations, George Clooney, a large steaming pile of excrement—select an image that you think best suits me or [is] based solely on your whim.”

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Crowdfunding And Venture Funding: Who's Better At Picking Winners?

A recent academic study looked at theater projects on Kickstarter, including one titled “Thanks For Playing: The Game Show Show!,” found that projects picked only by crowds were as likely to deliver on budget — and achieve commercial success and positive critical acclaim — as projects favored by experts.
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