How Microsoft Lost In Court Over Windows 10 Upgrades

In June a California woman successfully sued Microsoft for $ 10,000 over forced Windows 10 upgrades, and she’s now written a 58-page ebook about her battle (which she’s selling for $ 9.99). But an anonymous Slashdot reader shares another inspiring story about a Texas IT worker and Linux geek who got Microsoft to pay him $ 650 for all the time that he lost.

“Worley built a Windows 7 machine for his grandfather, who has Alzheimer’s Disease, [customized] to look like Windows XP, an operating system his grandfather still remembered well…” writes Digital Trends. “But thanks to Microsoft’s persistent Windows 10 upgrade program, Worley’s grandfather unknowingly initiated the Win 10 upgrade by clicking the ‘X’ to close an upgrade window.” After Worley filed a legal “Notice of Dispute,” Microsoft quickly agreed to his demand for $ 650, which he donated to a non-profit focusing on Alzheimer’s patients.

But according to the article, that’s just the beginning, since Worley now “hopes people impacted by the forced Windows 10 upgrade will write a complaint to Microsoft demanding a settlement for their wasted time and money in repairing the device,” and on his web page suggests that if people don’t need the money, they should give it to charities fighting Alzheimer’s. “If Microsoft isn’t going to wake up and realize that lobbing intentionally-tricky updates at people who don’t need and can’t use them actively damages not only the lives of the Alzheimer’s sufferer, but those of their whole family, then let’s cure the disease on Microsoft’s dime so their tactics and those of companies that will follow their reckless example aren’t as damaging.”
Worley suggests each Notice of Dispute should demand at least $ 50 per hour from Microsoft, adding “If recent history holds steady they might just write you a check!”

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Sony Wins Battle Over Preinstalled Windows in Europe’s Top Court

An anonymous reader shares an Ars Technica report: The sale of a computer equipped with pre-installed software isn’t an unfair commercial practice because most customers prefer to buy a laptop they can use straight away, Europe’s top court has ruled in a victory for Sony. “Failure to indicate the price of each item of pre-installed software” isn’t misleading, the Court of Justice of the European Union added in its ruling on Wednesday. The CJEU was asked to intervene after French citizen Vincent Deroo-Blanquart took Sony to court for failing to reimburse the cost of pre-installed software — Windows Vista Home Premium operating system — that he did not wish to use on a laptop. Sony refused and instead offered to cancel the sale altogether.

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Windows Telemetry Rolls Out

ihtoit writes: Last week came the warning, now comes the roll out. One of the most most controversial aspects of Windows 10 is coming to Windows 7 and 8. Microsoft has released upgrades which enable the company to track what a user is doing. The updates – KB3075249, KB3080149 and KB3068708 – all add “customer experience and diagnostic telemetry” to the older versions. gHacks points out that the updates will ignore any previous user preferences reporting: “These four updates ignore existing user preferences stored in Windows 7 and Windows 8 (including any edits made to the Hosts file) and immediately starts exchanging user data with vortex-win.data.microsoft.com and settings-win.data.microsoft.com.”

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Microsoft Killing Off Nokia’s Windows Phone Apps

jfruh writes: As Nokia’s smartphone division becomes more fully absorbed into Microsoft, the company is cleaning house and ending some apps and services that Nokia had developed specifically for Windows Phone. Lumia Storyteller, Lumia Beamer, Photobeamer, and Lumia Refocus are photo and video apps that integrate with online services, and those services will be shutting down on October 30. Microsoft says its to better commit resources to work on the mobile version of Windows 10, which is coming soon, but not all the features of the canceled services will appear in the new OS.

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Solar Windows Could Help Power Buildings

Lucas123 writes: Several companies are now beginning to roll out translucent photovoltaic films or solar cells embedded in windows that can supplement a significant amount of energy in the buildings where they’re used. SolarWindow Technologies, for example, is preparing to launch a transparent product made with organic PVs, while another company, Solaria, is cutting solar cells into thin strips and embedding them in windows. Both companies admit their products can’t produce the 20% efficiency ratings of today’s best rooftop solar panels, but they say that’s not their objective. Instead, the companies are looking to take advantage of millions of skyscraper windows that today are simply unused real estate for renewable energy. One company is aiming at supplementing 20% to 30% of a skyscrapers power requirements. Meanwhile, universities are also jumping into the solar window arena. Oxford University has spun off a PV window company that produces semi-transparent solar cells made of semi-transparent perovskite oxide that has achieved a 20% solar energy efficiency.

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Microsoft’s Telemetry Additions To Windows 7 and 8 Raise Privacy Concerns

WheezyJoe writes: ghacks and Ars Technica are providing more detail about Windows 10’s telemetry and “privacy invasion” features being backported to Windows 7 and 8. The articles list and explain some of the involved updates by number (e.g., KB3068708, KB3022345, KB3075249, and KB3080149). The Ars article says the Windows firewall can block the traffic just fine, and the service sending the telemetry can be disabled. “Additionally, most or all of the traffic appears to be contingent on participating in the CEIP in the first place. If the CEIP is disabled, it appears that little or no traffic gets sent. This may not always have been the case, however; the notes that accompany the 3080149 update say that the amount of network activity when not part of CEIP has been reduced.” The ghacks article explains other ways block the unwanted traffic and uninstall the updates.

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How To Keep Microsoft’s Nose Out of Your Personal Data In Windows 10

MojoKid writes: Amid the privacy concerns and arguably invasive nature of Microsoft’s Windows 10 regarding user information, it’s no surprise that details on how to minimize leaks as much as possible are often requested by users who have recently made the jump to the new operating system. If you are using Windows 10, or plan to upgrade soon, it’s worth bearing in mind a number of privacy-related options that are available, even during the installation/upgrade. If you are already running the OS and forgot to turn them off during installation (or didn’t even see them), they can be accessed via the Settings menu on the start menu, and then selecting Privacy from the pop-up menu. Among these menus are a plethora of options regarding what data can be gathered about you. It’s worth noting, however, that changing any of these options may disable various OS related services, namely Cortana, as Microsoft’s digital assistant has it tendrils buried deep.

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Windows 95 Turns 20

Etherwalk writes: Windows 95 turns 20 tomorrow, August 24, 2015. Users looking to upgrade from Windows 3.1 should be warned that some reviewers on the Amazon purchase page have been receiving 3.5″ high-density floppy disk versions instead of a modern 150 kbps CD-ROM disk. Do you remember first seeing or installing Windows 95? Do you have any systems still running it?

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Underground Piracy Sites Want To Block Windows 10 Users

An anonymous reader writes: Some smaller pirate sites have become concerned about Windows 10 system phoning home too many hints regarding that the users are accessing their site. Therefore, the pirate administrators have started blocking Windows 10 users from accessing the BitTorrent trackers that the sites host. The first ones to hit the alarm button were iTS, which have posted a statement and started redirecting Windows 10 users to a YouTube video called Windows 10 is a Tool to Spy on Everything You Do. Additionally, according to TorrentFreak, two other similar dark web torrent trackers are also considering following suit. “As we all know, Microsoft recently released Windows 10. You as a member should know, that we as a site are thinking about banning the OS from FSC,” said one of the FSC staff. Likewise, in a message to their users, a BB admin said something similar: “We have also found [Windows 10] will be gathering information on users’ P2P use to be shared with anti piracy group.”

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Could the Best Windows 10 Laptop Be a Mac?

dkatana writes: Now that Windows 10 is finally out there many people are looking for the best laptop with the power to make the new OS shine. The sweet spot appears to be in $ 900-$ 1500 machines from Dell, Asus and HP. But Apple, the company that has been fighting Windows for ever, has other options for Windows 10: the MacBook Pro and MacBook Air. According to InformationWeek there are many reasons to consider purchasing a MacBook as the next Windows machine, including design, reliability, performance, battery life, display quality and better keyboard. Also MacBooks have a higher resell value, retaining up to 50% of their price after five years.

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