It’s A Nasty And Wonderful World: A Note From This Weekend’s Guest Editor, Gideon Lichfield

The best things to come out of human tribalism are the stories, a few of which we’ll share here with you this weekend.
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Statue of Liberty, other world sites threatened by climate change, says U.N.

Statue of Liberty, other world sites threatened by climate change, says U.N.The Statue of Liberty is seen in New York harbor. Climate change might dampen Lady Liberty’s glow, according to experts. The United Nations released a report Thursday saying 31 natural and cultural World Heritage sites in 29 countries are vulnerable to the effects of climate change: rising temperatures, rising sea levels, intensifying storms, longer droughts and so on.



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Researcher: The US Owes the World $4 Trillion For Trashing the Climate

merbs writes: Climate change wasn’t created equal. Rich, industrialized nations have contributed most of the pollution and gone way over their carbon budgets—while smaller, poorer, and more agrarian countries are little to blame. The subsequent warming will, naturally, impact everyone, often hitting the poorer countries harder. So should rich countries pay up? Researcher Damon Matthews has quantified how much historically polluting nations owe their global neighbors—and it’s a lot.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


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Connecting the Unwired World With Balloons, Satellites, Lasers & Drones

1sockchuck writes: New projects are seeking to connect the unwired world using balloons, drones, lasers and satellites to deliver wireless Internet. There are dueling low-earth orbit satellite initiatives backed by billionaires Elon Musk (SpaceX) and Richard Branson (OneWeb), while Google’s Project Loon is using balloons (which sometimes crash) and Facebook is building a solar-powered UAV (Project Aquila). “The Connectivity Lab team is very focused on the technical challenges of reaching those people who are typically in the more rural, unconnected parts of the world,” Jay Parikh, vice president of engineering at Facebook says. “I think that we need to get them access. My hope is that we are able to deliver a very rich experience to them, including videos, photos and—some day—virtual reality and all of that stuff. But it’s a multi-, multi-, multi-year challenge, and I don’t see any end in sight right now.”

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


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