How The World’s Richest Doctor Gave Away Millions — To Himself

The world’s richest doctor had just made a $ 12 million gift to the University of Utah. Not mentioned in any of the tributes to his philanthropy: $ 10 million would be sent right back to one of his companies.
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World’s Largest Space Telescope Is Complete, Expected To Launch In 2018

An anonymous reader quotes a report from Space.com: After more than 20 years of construction, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is complete and, following in-depth testing, the largest-ever space telescope is expected to launch within two years, NASA officials announced today (Nov. 2). NASA Administrator Charles Bolden hosted a news conference to announce the milestone this morning at the agency’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland, overlooking the 18 large mirrors that will collect infrared light, sheltered behind a tennis-court-size sun shield. JWST is considered the successor to NASA’s iconic Hubble Space Telescope. The telescope will be much more powerful than even Hubble for two main reasons, Mather said at the conference. First, it will be the biggest telescope mirror to fly in space. “You can see this beautiful, gold telescope is seven times the collecting area of the Hubble telescope,” Mather said. And second, it is designed to collect infrared light, which Hubble is not very sensitive to. Earth’s atmosphere glows in the infrared, so such measurements can’t be made from the ground. Hubble emits its own heat, which would obscure infrared readings. JWST will run close to absolute zero in temperature and rest at a point in space called the Lagrange Point 2, which is directly behind Earth from the sun’s perspective. That way, Earth can shield the telescope from the sun’s infrared emission, and the sun shield can protect the telescope from both bodies’ heat. The telescope’s infrared view will pierce through obscuring cosmic dust to reveal the universe’s first galaxies and spy on newly forming planetary systems. It also will be sensitive enough to analyze the atmospheres of exoplanets that pass in front of their stars, perhaps to search for signs of life, Mather said. The telescope would be able to see a bumblebee a moon’s distance away, he added — both in reflected light and in the body heat the bee emitted. Its mirrors are so smooth that if you stretched the array to the size of the U.S., the hills and valleys of irregularity would be only a few inches high, Mather said.

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World’s Most Powerful Digital Camera Sees Construction Green Light

An anonymous reader writes: The Department of Energy has approved the construction of the Large Synoptic Survey Telecscope’s 3.2-gigapixel digital camera, which will be the most advanced in the world. When complete the camera will weigh more than three tons and take such high resolution pictures that it would take 1,500 high-definition televisions to display one of them. According to SLAC: “tarting in 2022, LSST will take digital images of the entire visible southern sky every few nights from atop a mountain called Cerro Pachón in Chile. It will produce a wide, deep and fast survey of the night sky, cataloging by far the largest number of stars and galaxies ever observed. During a 10-year time frame, LSST will detect tens of billions of objects—the first time a telescope will observe more galaxies than there are people on Earth – and will create movies of the sky with unprecedented details. Funding for the camera comes from the DOE, while financial support for the telescope and site facilities, the data management system, and the education and public outreach infrastructure of LSST comes primarily from the National Science Foundation (NSF).”

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A Look At the World’s First Virtual Reality Theme Park

redletterdave writes: The Void is the first company to create a virtual reality theme park, where virtual experiences are layered on top of physical, real world environments. Tech Insider was the first media outlet to visit The Void’s headquarters in Utah, filming the company’s first creations. These experiences are still far from final, but the footage is impressive and entertaining.

This is not Lazer Tag.

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Amid Agony, Scientists Discover World’s First Venomous Frog

sciencehabit writes: Some discoveries come with a price, and Brazilian biologists Carlos Jared’s discovery of the world’s first known venomous frog came with agony. When Carlos picked up a Brazilian hylid frog—a small, lumpy, green amphibian—while doing fieldwork the frog raked him with spines hidden within its upper lip across the hand. He dropped the frog, and excruciating pain shot up his arm for the next 5 hours. It was known that some frog secrete poison onto their skin but this species has have tiny spines on their heads and upper lips that enable them to inject lethal venom directly into the bloodstream. C. greening’s venom is twice as potent as that of the deadly pit viper, the researchers report.

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NASA’s Drone For Other Worlds

An anonymous reader writes: A group of engineers is building a new drone. What sets this apart from the hundreds of other drone development projects going on around the world? Well, these engineers are at the Kennedy Space Center, and the drone will be used to gather samples on other worlds. The drone is specifically designed to be able to fly in low- or no-atmosphere situations. Senior technologist Rob Mueller describes it as a “prospecting robot.” He says, “The first step in being able to use resources on Mars or an asteroid is to find out where the resources are. They are most likely in hard-to-access areas where there is permanent shadow. Some of the crater walls are angled 30 degrees or more, and that’s far too steep for a traditional rover to navigate and climb.” They face major challenges with rotor and gas-jet design, they have to figure out navigation without GPS, and the whole system needs to be largely autonomous — you can’t really steer a drone yourself with a latency of several minutes (or more).

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